baccalaureate

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bac·ca·lau·re·ate

 (băk′ə-lôr′ē-ĭt)
n.
2. A farewell address in the form of a sermon delivered to a graduating class.

[Medieval Latin baccalaureātus, from baccalārius, bachelor (influenced by laureātus, crowned with laurel); see bachelor.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

baccalaureate

(ˌbækəˈlɔːrɪɪt)
n
1. (Education) the university degree of Bachelor or Arts, Bachelor of Science, etc
2. (Education) an internationally recognized programme of study, comprising different subjects, offered as an alternative to a course of A levels in Britain
3. (Education) US a farewell sermon delivered at the commencement ceremonies in many colleges and universities
[C17: from Medieval Latin baccalaureātus, from baccalaureus advanced student, alteration of baccalārius bachelor; influenced in folk etymology by Latin bāca berry + laureus laurel]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bac•ca•lau•re•ate

(ˌbæk əˈlɔr i ɪt, -ˈlɒr-)

n.
2. a religious service held for a graduating class.
3. Also called baccalau′reate ser`mon. the sermon delivered at such a service.
[1615–25; < Medieval Latin baccalaureātus, derivative of baccalaure(us) advanced student, bachelor, variant of baccalārius bachelor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

baccalaureate

A bachelor’s degree.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baccalaureate - a farewell sermon to a graduating class at their commencement ceremoniesbaccalaureate - a farewell sermon to a graduating class at their commencement ceremonies
preaching, sermon, discourse - an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)
commencement ceremony, commencement exercise, graduation exercise, commencement, graduation - an academic exercise in which diplomas are conferred
2.baccalaureate - an academic degree conferred on someone who has successfully completed undergraduate studiesbaccalaureate - an academic degree conferred on someone who has successfully completed undergraduate studies
academic degree, degree - an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study; "he earned his degree at Princeton summa cum laude"
AB, Artium Baccalaurens, Bachelor of Arts, BA - a bachelor's degree in arts and sciences
ABLS, Bachelor of Arts in Library Science - a bachelor's degree in library science
Bachelor of Arts in Nursing, BAN - a bachelor's degree in nursing
Bachelor of Divinity, BD - a bachelor's degree in religion
Bachelor of Literature, BLitt - a bachelor's degree in literature
Bachelor of Medicine, MB - (a British degree) a bachelor's degree in medicine
Bachelor of Music, BMus - a bachelor's degree in music
Bachelor of Naval Science, BNS - a bachelor's degree in naval science
Bachelor of Science, BS, SB - a bachelor's degree in science
Bachelor of Science in Architecture, BSArch - a bachelor's degree in architecture
Bachelor of Science in Engineering - a bachelor's degree in engineering
Bachelor of Theology, ThB - a bachelor's degree in theology
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

baccalaureate

[ˌbækəˈlɔːrɪɪt] Nbachillerato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

baccalaureate

[bækəˈlɔːriət]
nbaccalauréat m
international baccalaureate → baccalauréat international
modif (US) [service, address] → de remise de diplômes
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Just as the community colleges became a disruptive innovation in the early '60s, community college baccalaureates are beginning to surge because there is a growing need for options," says Dr.
Uminski also left open the possibility of unofficial baccalaureates held in churches.
"We could have two routes going in different directions ( specialist diplomas in one direction, baccalaureates in the other.
* Less than two percent of the nation's 1,157 community colleges grant baccalaureates.
As of early December, 11 states had granted their community colleges authorization to confer baccalaureates, and 17 two-year institutions were already awarding degrees or were in the process of doing so, according to the Community College Baccalaureate Association.
Women have made substantial progress in preparing for careers in science and engineering, earning over half of the baccalaureates, 44 percent of the master's and 37 percent of the doctorates, but still only comprise about a fourth of the science and engineering workforce, according to the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology.
Dale banned principals and other top officials from speaking at baccalaureates but said teachers may do so.
This study examined the extent to which minority individuals with baccalaureate origins as non-traditional students (baccalaureates completed at age 25 or over) completed doctoral degrees in science and engineering.
In a move that was recently described as "statesmanlike" in the Florida higher education community, Edison's president, Ken Walker, redesigned Edison's original proposal (to award free-standing baccalaureates) into a mission-complementary partnership with Gulf Coast University to offer a baccalaureate in public services.
There are several strong arguments for the long-term benefits of community college-granted baccalaureates as well.
Garmon suggests that community college baccalaureates fill a niche four-year colleagues cannot, providing a unique mix and range of courses and programs in needed areas while maintaining access and affordability.

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