backfall

backfall

(ˈbækˌfɔːl)
n
1. wrestling a fall or throw onto the back
2. (Instruments) music a horizontal bar forming part of the internal mechanism of an organ
Translations
gropponata
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, The "second" cloud solution will also create a backfall and the possibility of risk reduction in relation to cloud infrastructure.
A remarkable narrative poem from the period of his mid-1970s collection High Island is "Seals at High Island," and in it the poet presents first the copulation of two seals and then the battle of two bulls for dominance, an aspect of "nature red in tooth and claw" that juxtaposes the life force depicted in the poem yielding to the enraged desire to wound and kill: "Swayed by the thrust and backfall of the tide, / A dappled grey bull and a brindled cow / Copulate in the green water of a cove.
The Graham backfall, unlike anything on any other stage, sends the dancer backward to earth in a blind wind-sheer horizontal from knee to neck, down in one sharp count or in dream-time feather-slow motion.
The only real backfall is the weather, like the heat in the summer.
The water becomes hotter rather than deeper on page 115 at the phrase: "Some like to call the termination that goes above the note an overthrow (superjectio); and the one which goes below the note a backfall.
When playing on 8 ' flutes alone, a certain amount of action-rattle can be heard, no doubt the result of historically correct unbushed backfalls.
Caldwell's Preface is much more helpful, but it could be argued that, for those whose familiarity with backfalls and beats is a little hazy, some further detailed guidance on this important subject would not have been insulting.