backslash

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back·slash

 (băk′slăsh′)
n.
A backward virgule ( \ ).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

backslash

(ˈbækˌslæʃ)
n
(Grammar) a slash which slopes to the left \
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

back•slash

(ˈbækˌslæʃ)
n.
a short oblique stroke (\): used in some computer operating systems to mark the division between a directory and a subdirectory, as in typing a path.
[1985–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
obrácené lomítko
backslash
kenoviivatakakenoviiva
barre oblique inverséebarre oblique inverse
obrnuta kosa crta
törtvonal
バックスラッシュ
백슬래시
backslashomgekeerde schuine streepschuine streep naar achterschuine streep naar linksschuine streepje achteruit
opačná lomka
omvänt snedstreck
เครื่องหมาย มักใช้ในคอมพิวเตอร์
geriye yatık çizgiters kesir işareti
dấu vạch chéo ngược

backslash

[ˈbækslæʃ] N (Typ) → barra f inversa
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

backslash

[ˈbækslæʃ] nbarre f oblique inversée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

backslash

[ˈbækˌslæʃ] n (Typ) → barra obliqua inversa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

back

(bӕk) noun
1. in man, the part of the body from the neck to the bottom of the spine. She lay on her back.
2. in animals, the upper part of the body. She put the saddle on the horse's back.
3. that part of anything opposite to or furthest from the front. the back of the house; She sat at the back of the hall.
4. in football, hockey etc a player who plays behind the forwards.
adjective
of or at the back. the back door.
adverb
1. to, or at, the place or person from which a person or thing came. I went back to the shop; He gave the car back to its owner.
2. away (from something); not near (something). Move back! Let the ambulance get to the injured man; Keep back from me or I'll hit you!
3. towards the back (of something). Sit back in your chair.
4. in return; in response to. When the teacher is scolding you, don't answer back.
5. to, or in, the past. Think back to your childhood.
verb
1. to (cause to) move backwards. He backed (his car) out of the garage.
2. to help or support. Will you back me against the others?
3. to bet or gamble on. I backed your horse to win.
ˈbacker noun
a person who supports someone or something, especially with money. the backer of the new theatre.
ˈbackbite verb
to criticize a person when he is not present.
ˈbackbiting noun
Constant backbiting by her colleagues led to her resignation.
ˈbackbone noun
1. the spine. the backbone of a fish.
2. the chief support. The older employees are the backbone of the industry.
ˈbackbreaking adjective
(of a task etc) very difficult or requiring very hard work. Digging the garden is a backbreaking job.
ˌbackˈdate verb
1. to put an earlier date on (a cheque etc). He should have paid his bill last month and so he has backdated the cheque.
2. to make payable from a date in the past. Our rise in pay was backdated to April.
ˌbackˈfire verb
1. (of a motor-car etc) to make a loud bang because of unburnt gases in the exhaust system. The car backfired.
2. (of a plan etc) to have unexpected results, often opposite to the intended results. His scheme backfired (on him), and he lost money.
ˈbackground noun
1. the space behind the principal or most important figures or objects of a picture etc. He always paints ships against a background of stormy skies; trees in the background of the picture.
2. happenings that go before, and help to explain, an event etc. the background to a situation.
3. a person's origins, education etc. She was ashamed of her humble background.
ˈbackhand noun
1. in tennis etc, a stroke or shot with the back of one's hand turned towards the ball. a clever backhand; His backhand is very strong.
2. writing with the letters sloping backwards. I can always recognize her backhand.
adverb
using backhand. She played the stroke backhand; She writes backhand.
ˈbacklog noun
a pile of uncompleted work etc which has collected. a backlog of orders because of the strike.
ˌback-ˈnumber noun
an out-of-date copy or issue of a magazine etc. He collects back-numbers of comic magazines.
ˈbackpack noun
(especially American) a bag that walkers, people who go on trips, or students carry on their backs.
ˈbackpacking: go backpacking
to go on trips or go camping carrying a backpack.
ˈbackpacker noun
ˈbackside noun
the bottom or buttocks. He sits on his backside all day long and does no work.
ˈbackslash noun
the sign (\).
ˈbackstroke noun
in swimming, a stroke made when lying on one's back in the water. The child is good at backstroke.
ˈbackup noun
1. additional people who provide help when it is needed. The police officer requested some backup when the shooting began.
2. a copy of a computer file that can be used in case the original is destroyed.
3. (also adjective) a piece of equipment, a system etc that can be used when there is a problem with the original one. a backup plan; We have a backup generator in case the power fails.
ˈbackwash noun
1. a backward current eg that following a ship's passage through the water. the backwash of the steamer.
2. the unintentional results of an action, situation etc. The backwash of that firm's financial troubles affected several other firms.
ˈbackwater noun
1. a stretch of river not in the main stream.
2. a place not affected by what is happening in the world outside. That village is rather a backwater.
ˌbackˈyard noun
(especially American) a garden at the back of a house etc. He grows vegetables in his backyard.
back down
to give up one's opinion, claim etc. She backed down in the face of strong opposition.
back of
(American) behind. He parked back of the store.
back on to
(of a building etc) to have its back next to (something). My house backs on to the racecourse.
back out
1. to move out backwards. He opened the garage door and backed (his car) out.
2. to withdraw from a promise etc. You promised to help – you mustn't back out now!
back up
1. to support or encourage. The new evidence backed up my arguments.
2. to make a copy of the information stored on the computer or disk.
have one's back to the wall
to be in a very difficult or desperate situation. He certainly has his back to the wall as he has lost his job and cannot find another one.
put someone's back up
to anger someone. He put my back up with his boasting.
take a back seat
to take an unimportant position. At these discussions he always takes a back seat and listens to others talking.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

backslash

شَرْطَة مائِلَة لِلخَلْف obrácené lomítko backslash Backslash ανάποδη κάθετος barra invertida, reacción violenta takakenoviiva barre oblique inversée obrnuta kosa crta barra inversa バックスラッシュ 백슬래시 schuine streepje achteruit omvendt skråstrek ukośnik barra invertida обратная косая черта omvänt snedstreck เครื่องหมาย มักใช้ในคอมพิวเตอร์ geriye yatık çizgi dấu vạch chéo ngược 反斜线符号
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
In Swerve, 2013, a pair of backslashes, like those of any website URL, drift through a diaphanous mauve squiggle.
(8) Users in the Windows platform should be aware that the folder path has to set using forward slashes (/) and not backslashes, which is the default.
...climb inside the piano of your wiring: string pull, vibrate & stretch through the muted organ of your oh, your yes, your baby, grand Perhaps Winrock's signature subversion, however, is her use of nouns as verbs, which feel at once strange and wildly precise--"If it's romantic to architect a thing // back into its bones--: imagine us in ruins / from the start." Unlike many other opulent poets of her generation, who often value fluidity of movement as much as they worship excess, Winrock makes poems that fracture to live--colons break up sentences ("Check : unconsciousness : for the romance"), backslashes crack open words ("In/Ferno Black/Out"), and words are cleaved along enjambed lines ("a blinked eye-/ lash", "across bridges and sound-/ board", "a charm of humming-/ birds").
Open custom kitchens feature Quartz countertops and backslashes, high gloss lacquer cabinetry locally manufactured by Bazzeo, and top-of-the-line appliances by Gaggenau.
Another common gotcha is the use of backslashes. As with a number of programming languages, Origin uses the backslash as an escape character to modify the function of the character following it.
However, this pro-consumer or producer mechanism is missing in Pakistan, which is responsible for economic backslashes, creating hell for ordinary man.
London, Oct 14 (ANI): Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the world-wide-web, has finally accepted that he could have created the web without the two backslashes, //, that Internet users often grumbled about.
Other reasons of non-linearity are amplitude modularity of digital-to-analogue conversion, complex signal levels, semi-controllability of power converters, saturation in the magnetic chains of electric machines, plugs and gaps, backslashes, and Coulomb and fluid friction of mechanical gears and actuators.
Three years before its appearance in print, Danielewski "found a crummy URL, all kinds of backslashes and forward slashes and tildes and posted it as a pdf file." (27) His reasons were mostly economic: "I didn't have the money to xerox and ship off this huge manuscript, so I got one of these terrible URLs and posted the thing as a pdf file on the Internet." (28) Then, after receiving a publishing contract, but before the novel's formal release, the novel was again uploaded to the Internet: online in serialized installments by the publisher.
(If you want to display a backslash, you just enter two backslashes "\\".)