bacon


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Related to bacon: Francis Bacon

ba·con

 (bā′kən)
n.
The salted and smoked meat from the back and sides of a pig.

[Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English bæc, back.]

bacon

(ˈbeɪkən)
n
1. (Cookery) meat from the back and sides of a pig, dried, salted, and usually smoked
2. bring home the bacon informal
a. to achieve success
b. to provide material support
3. save someone's bacon informal Brit to help someone to escape from danger
[C12: from Old French bacon, from Old High German bahho; related to Old Saxon baco; see back1]

Bacon

(ˈbeɪkən)
n
1. (Biography) Francis, Baron Verulam, Viscount St Albans. 1561–1626, English philosopher, statesman, and essayist; described the inductive method of reasoning: his works include Essays (1625), The Advancement of Learning (1605), and Novum Organum (1620)
2. (Biography) Francis. 1909–92, British painter, born in Dublin, noted for his distorted, richly coloured human figures, dogs, and carcasses
3. (Biography) Roger. ?1214–92, English Franciscan monk, scholar, and scientist: stressed the importance of experiment, demonstrated that air is required for combustion, and first used lenses to correct vision. His Opus Majus (1266) is a compendium of all the sciences of his age

ba•con

(ˈbeɪ kən)

n.
the back and sides of a hog, salted and dried or smoked, usu. sliced thin and fried.
Idioms:
bring home the bacon,
a. to support oneself or one's family; earn a living.
b. to succeed.
[1300–50; Middle English bacoun < Anglo-French; Old French bacon < Germanic *bakōn- (Old High German bacho back, ham, bacon), derivative of *baka- back1; compare Middle Dutch bake bacon]

Ba•con

(ˈbeɪ kən)

n.
1. Francis (Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans), 1561–1626, English essayist, philosopher, and statesman.
2. Francis, 1910–92, English painter, born in Ireland.
3. Nathaniel, 1647–76, American colonist, born in England: leader of a rebellion in Virginia 1676.
4. Roger, 1214?–94?, English philosopher and scientist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacon - back and sides of a hog salted and dried or smokedbacon - back and sides of a hog salted and dried or smoked; usually sliced thin and fried
cut of pork - cut of meat from a hog or pig
side of bacon, flitch - salted and cured abdominal wall of a side of pork
gammon - hind portion of a side of bacon
bacon strip - a slice of bacon
bacon rind - the rind of bacon
Canadian bacon - from a boned strip of cured loin
2.bacon - English scientist and Franciscan monk who stressed the importance of experimentationBacon - English scientist and Franciscan monk who stressed the importance of experimentation; first showed that air is required for combustion and first used lenses to correct vision (1220-1292)
3.bacon - English statesman and philosopherBacon - English statesman and philosopher; precursor of British empiricism; advocated inductive reasoning (1561-1626)
Translations
لـَحْم خَنْزِير مُقَدَّدلَحْم من فَخْذ الخَنْزير
slanina
bacon
pekonikylki
slanina
angolszalonna
beikon
ベーコン
베이컨
rūkytas bekonassūdytas bekonas
bekonsspeķis
slanina
slanina
bacon
thịt lợn muối xông khói

bacon

[ˈbeɪkən] Nbeicon m (Sp), tocino m (LAm), panceta f (Arg)
bacon and eggshuevos mpl con tocino
to bring home the bacon (= earn one's living) → ganarse las habichuelas
to save sb's baconsalvar el pellejo a algn

bacon

[ˈbeɪkən] n (= meat) (lean)bacon m; (fatty)lard m
bacon and eggs → des œufs au bacon
a rasher of bacon → une tranche de lard
to bring home the bacon (= earn money) → faire bouillir la marmite (= achieve one's goal) → décrocher la timbale
to save sb's bacon (British)sauver la peau à qn

bacon

ndurchwachsener Speck; bacon and eggsEier mit Speck; to save somebody’s bacon (inf)jds Rettung sein; to bring home the bacon (inf: = earn a living) → die Brötchen verdienen (inf)

bacon

[ˈbeɪkən] npancetta
bacon and eggs → uova fpl con pancetta

bacon

(ˈbeikən) noun
the flesh of the back and sides of a pig, salted and dried, used as food.

bacon

لـَحْم خَنْزِير مُقَدَّد slanina bacon Speck μπέικον panceta, tocino pekoni bacon slanina pancetta ベーコン 베이컨 bacon bacon bekon bacon бекон bacon เนื้อด้านหลังและส่วนนอกของหมูที่ใส่เกลือรมควัน domuz pastırması thịt lợn muối xông khói 咸肉
References in classic literature ?
Jo regarded them as worthy of Bacon, Milton, or Shakespeare, and remodeled her own works with good effect, she thought.
On Sundays she gave us as much chicken as we could eat, and on other days we had ham or bacon or sausage meat.
For, though bred a lawyer, and accustomed to speak of Bacon, Coke, Noye, and Finch, as his professional associates, the exigenties of this new country had transformed Governor Bellingham into a soldier, as well as a statesman and ruler.
In the porkers he saw carved out the future sleek side of bacon, and juicy relishing ham; not a turkey but he beheld daintily trussed up, with its gizzard under its wing, and, peradventure, a necklace of savory sausages; and even bright chanticleer himself lay sprawling on his back, in a side dish, with uplifted claws, as if craving that quarter which his chivalrous spirit disdained to ask while living.
Here was where they made Brown's Imperial Hams and Bacon, Brown's Dressed Beef, Brown's Excelsior Sausages
said Aunt Chloe, pausing while she was greasing a griddle with a scrap of bacon on her fork, and regarding young Master George with pride.
There was a fifty-pound sack of corn meal, and a side of bacon, ammunition, and a four-gallon jug of whisky, and an old book and two newspapers for wadding, besides some tow.
The Terror of the Seas had brought a side of bacon, and had about worn himself out with getting it there.
It's oftenest naught but bread," he said, "but I've got a fine slice o' fat bacon with it today.
I fancied she was jealous even of the saucepan on it; and I have reason to know that she took its impressment into the service of boiling my egg and broiling my bacon, in dudgeon; for I saw her, with my own discomfited eyes, shake her fist at me once, when those culinary operations were going on, and no one else was looking.
And after each figure was disposed of, it was as much as I could do to get a bite or a sup, before the next came; while he sat at his ease guessing nothing, and eating bacon and hot roll, in (if I may be allowed the expression) a gorging and gormandising manner.
The fool,'' answered Wamba, raising the relics of a gammon of bacon, ``will take care to erect a bulwark against the knave.