adhesion

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ad·he·sion

 (ăd-hē′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The process or condition of sticking or staying attached: the adhesion of the glue to wood.
b. Physics The physical attraction or joining of two substances, especially the macroscopically observable attraction of dissimilar substances.
2. Medicine
a. A condition in which bodily tissues that are normally separate grow together.
b. A fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures.
3. Attachment or devotion, as to a religion or belief.

[French adhésion, from Latin adhaesiō, adhaesiōn-, from adhaesus, past participle of adhaerēre, to adhere; see adhere.]

adhesion

(ədˈhiːʒən)
n
1. the quality or condition of sticking together or holding fast
2. ability to make firm contact without skidding or slipping
3. attachment or fidelity, as to a political party, cause, etc
4. (General Physics) an attraction or repulsion between the molecules of unlike substances in contact: distinguished from cohesion
5. (Pathology) pathol abnormal union of structures or parts
[C17: from Latin adhaesiōn- a sticking. See adhere]
Usage: Adhesion is the preferred term when talking about sticking or holding fast in a physical sense. Adherence is preferred when talking about attachment to a political party, cause, etc

ad•he•sion

(ædˈhi ʒən)

n.
1. the act, state, or quality of adhering.
2. steady or devoted attachment, support, etc.; adherence.
3. assent; concurrence.
4. the attractive molecular force that tends to hold together unlike bodies where they are in contact.
5.
a. the abnormal union of adjacent tissues.
b. the tissue involved.
[1615–25; < Latin adhaesiō act of adhering]
ad•he′sion•al, adj.

adhesion

1. A force of attraction between molecules.
2. Abnormal joining of tissues caused by inflammation, resulting in scarring.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adhesion - abnormal union of bodily tissuesadhesion - abnormal union of bodily tissues; most common in the abdomen
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
symphysis - an abnormal adhesion of two or more structures
synechia - adhesions between the iris and the lens or cornea resulting from trauma or eye surgery or as a complication of glaucoma or cataract; can lead to blindness
2.adhesion - a fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures
scar tissue - the connective tissue that forms a scar; consists of fibroblasts in new scars and collagen fibers in old scars
3.adhesion - the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different compositionadhesion - the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different composition; "the mutual adhesiveness of cells"; "a heated hydraulic press was required for adhesion"
stickiness - the property of sticking to a surface
4.adhesion - faithful support for a cause or political party or religionadhesion - faithful support for a cause or political party or religion; "attachment to a formal agenda"; "adherence to a fat-free diet"; "the adhesion of Seville was decisive"
support - aiding the cause or policy or interests of; "the president no longer has the support of his own party"; "they developed a scheme of mutual support"
ecclesiasticism - excessive adherence to ecclesiastical forms and activities; "their ecclesiasticism overwhelmed their religion"
cabalism, kabbalism - adherence to some extreme traditional theological concept or interpretation
royalism - adherence or attachment to a monarchy or to the principle of monarchal government
traditionalism - adherence to tradition (especially in cultural or religious matters)

adhesion

noun sticking, grip, attachment, cohesion, coherence, adherence, adhesiveness Better equipment will improve track adhesion.
Usage: Adhesion is preferred when talking about sticking or holding fast in a physical sense and a useful alternative that could be used here is sticking. The word adherence, although close in meaning, would be the preferred word when talking about principles, rules and values.

adhesion

noun
The close physical union of two objects:
Translations
إلْتِصَاق
lpěníoddanost
fastklæbning
viîloîun; hollusta
klijailipnusprilipimas
pielipšana
yapışma

adhesion

[ədˈhiːʒən] n (to idea, theory)adhésion f

adhesion

n
(of particles etc)Adhäsion f, → Haftfähigkeit f; (more firmly: of glue) → Klebefestigkeit f

adhesion

[ədˈhiːʒn] n (Tech) → aderenza (fig) (of supporters) → consenso

adhesion

(ədˈhiːʒən) noun
the act or quality of adhering (to).
adˈhesive (-siv) adjective
able to adhere; sticky. adhesive tape.
noun
a substance which makes things stick. The tiles would not stick as he was using the wrong adhesive.

ad·he·sion

n. adhesión, adherencia, brida.

adhesion

n adherencia, brida
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Bacterial colonization of DJ stents has been shown to start within hours as stents become covered by host proteins which facilitate bacterial adhesion (13).
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Bacterial adhesion on commercially pure titanium and zirconium oxide disks: an in vivo human study.
Surfaces in the food industry are susceptible to bacterial adhesion and are; therefore, potential sources of contamination if microbial biofilms are formed (ROSSONI & GAYLARDE, 2000).
The oil-infused plastic surfaces are naturally anti-fouling, meaning they resist bacterial adhesion and growth.
faecalis is highly prevalent in endodontic retreatment cases (14), rinsing with DNase might serve as a therapeutic adjunct, provided that it prevents bacterial adhesion to the canal wall and/or disperses established biofilms of E.
Bacterial adhesion and auto aggregation thought to be associated with surface proteins, that can also enhance the cell hydrophobicity but impart hydrophilic characteristics are imparted by polysaccharides molecules (Mora et al., 2015).
Bactiguard AB is a Swedish medical device company whose technology reduces the risk of healthcare-associated infections by reducing bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on medical devices.