pigmentation

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pig·men·ta·tion

 (pĭg′mən-tā′shən)
n. Biology
1. Coloration of tissues by pigment.
2. Deposition of pigment by cells.

pigmentation

(ˌpɪɡmənˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Biology) coloration in plants, animals, or man caused by the presence of pigments
2. (Biology) the deposition of pigment in animals, plants, or man

pig•men•ta•tion

(ˌpɪg mənˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. coloration, esp. of the skin.
2. Biol. coloration with or deposition of pigment.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pigmentation - the deposition of pigment in animals or plants or human beingspigmentation - the deposition of pigment in animals or plants or human beings
deposition, deposit - the natural process of laying down a deposit of something
2.pigmentation - coloration of living tissues by pigment
coloration, colouration - appearance with regard to color; "her healthy coloration"
chromatism - abnormal pigmentation
melanoderma - abnormally dark skin caused by increased deposits of melatonin
depigmentation - absence or loss of pigmentation (or less than normal pigmentation) in the skin or hair
Translations
تَخَضُّب، تَلَوُّن
pigmentace
pigmentering
elszínezõdésszínezõdés
litarháttur
pigmentácia
renklenme

pigmentation

[ˌpɪgmənˈteɪʃən] Npigmentación f

pigmentation

[ˌpɪgmɛnˈteɪʃən] npigmentation f

pigmentation

pigmentation

[ˌpɪgmənˈteɪʃn] npigmentazione f

pigment

(ˈpigmənt) noun
1. any substance used for colouring, making paint etc. People used to make paint and dyes from natural pigments.
2. a substance in plants or animals that gives colour to the skin, leaves etc. Some people have darker pigment in their skin than others.
ˌpigmenˈtation noun
colouring (of skin etc). Some illnesses cause a loss of pigmentation.

pig·men·ta·tion

n. pigmentación, coloración.

pigmentation

n pigmentación f
References in periodicals archive ?
This data suggests that the lack of bacterial pigmentation made the bacterial DNA more susceptible to UV-induced DNA damage (Fig.

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