bacterial plaque


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Related to bacterial plaque: subgingival plaque

bacterial plaque

n
(Dentistry) another term for dental plaque
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacterial plaque - a film of mucus and bacteria deposited on the teeth that encourages the development of dental cariesbacterial plaque - a film of mucus and bacteria deposited on the teeth that encourages the development of dental caries
plaque - (pathology) a small abnormal patch on or inside the body
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6) Increased inflammation in response to bacterial plaque, a hallmark of hyperglycemia-associated periodontal disease, may contribute to localized osseous changes, resulting in diminished quantity and quality of surrounding bone.
If possible, brush afterwards and if that is not possible, swish with water to help clean the mouth so that food does not stay on the teeth, which allows more acid production by the bacterial plaque that coats the teeth and leads to decay.
bacterial plaque, gingivitis, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies, oral injuries and restorations).
Your dentist will use a probe to measure the "cuff" of gum around your teeth and probably give them a thorough clean to remove the bacterial plaque that causes the gums to become inflamed and can erode the "footings" of the tooth.
In addition to possible links between heart disease and gum disease found in the Scottish Health Survey, other studies appear to confirm a link between gum disease and diabetes, where patients with type 2 diabetes and inflammation in the mouth caused by bacterial plaque had more difficulty controlling their blood sugar levels.
More than bacterial plaque control, in this case, an important role has the association between the individual dental hygiene with the food control and the flour using in a large scale.
People who smoke are more likely to produce bacterial plaque that leads to gum disease.
People who smoke are more likely to produce bacterial plaque that leads to gum disease, tooth staining, bad breath, and in more severe cases mouth cancer.
of action, which is to reduce the adherence of bacterial plaque to the teeth
4) It is caused by the bacterial plaque, or biofilm, which forms on the teeth and underneath the gums.
It can also be the result of build-up of bacterial plaque and over-zealous brushing.
Smokers are much more likely than non-smokers to have bacterial plaque and tartar form on their teeth, have deeper pockets between the teeth and gums and lose more of the bone and tissue that support the teeth.

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