bacteriological


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bac·te·ri·ol·o·gy

 (băk-tîr′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of bacteria, especially in relation to medicine and agriculture.

bac·te′ri·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), bac·te′ri·o·log′i·cal adj.
bac·te′ri·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
bac·te′ri·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bacteriological - of or relating to bacteriologybacteriological - of or relating to bacteriology  
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جُرثومي، بَكتيريولوجي
bakteriologický
bakteriologisk
bakteriológiai
gerla-/bakteríufræîilegur
bakteriologický
bakteriyolojik

bacteriological

[bækˌtɪərɪəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] ADJbacteriológico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bacteriological

[bækˌtɪəriəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] adjbactériologique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bacteriological

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bacteriological

[bækˌtɪərɪəˈlɒdʒɪkl] adjbatteriologico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bacteria

(bakˈtiəriə) singular bacˈterium (-əm) noun plural
organisms not able to be seen except under a microscope, found in rotting matter, in air, in soil and in living bodies, some being the germs of disease. a throat infection caused by bacteria.
bacˌteriˈology (-ˈolədʒi) noun
the study of bacteria.
bacˌterioˈlogical (ˈlo-) adjective
bacˌteriˈologist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

bacteriological

a. bacteriológico-a, rel. a las bacterias.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It prohibits the use of "asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and of all analogous liquids, materials or devices" and "bacteriological methods of warfare".
The study considers the effectiveness of immunoscopic method in determining causative agent through ACL-method results with the results of bacteriological method of investigation samples of the clinical material in children at the early age who have sepsis.
Although many postmortem bacteriological cultures in SUDI yield organisms, most seem to be unrelated to the cause of death.
Outbreaks of endotoxin-related illness associated with drinking water have been documented infrequently, probably because many outbreaks of fever-related illness from water are not commonly identified by routine medical and bacteriological analyses (2).
As suggested earlier, this should be a loud signal to the operator that bacteriological testing should be done to insure that other contaminants like Giardia and crypto haven't entered with the algae.
As Melosi recounts in Part II of The Sanitary City, the bacteriological revolution provided the means to effectively combat epidemic disease.
Council inspectors currently monitor bacteriological contamination and disinfectant levels at 33 pools.
(1.) Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction, opened for signature at Washington, London, and Moscow April 10, 1972; entered into force March 26, 1975.
Yet many American doctors were skeptical of this European breakthrough and their doubt curtailed universal use of bacteriological diagnosis.