bag and baggage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

bag

 (băg)
n.
1.
a. A container of flexible material, such as paper, plastic, or leather, that is used for carrying or storing items.
b. A handbag; a purse.
c. A piece of hand luggage, such as a suitcase or satchel.
d. A pouchlike or sagging organ or part of the body, such as a cow's udder.
2. An object that resembles a pouch.
3. Nautical The sagging or bulging part of a sail.
4. The amount that a bag can hold.
5. An amount of game taken or legally permitted to be taken.
6. Baseball A base.
7. Slang An area of interest or skill: Cooking is not my bag.
8. Slang A woman considered ugly or unkempt.
v. bagged, bag·ging, bags
v.tr.
1. To put into a bag: bag groceries.
2. To cause to bulge like a pouch.
3. To capture or kill as game: bagged six grouse.
4. Informal
a. To gain; acquire: He bagged a profit from the sale.
b. To capture or arrest: was bagged for trespassing.
c. To accomplish or achieve: bagged a birdie with a long putt.
5. Slang
a. To fail to attend purposely; skip: bagged classes for the day and went to the beach.
b. To stop doing or considering; abandon: bagged the idea and started from scratch.
c. To terminate the employment of.
v.intr.
1. To pack items in a bag.
2. To hang loosely: The pants bag at the knees.
3. To swell out; bulge.
Phrasal Verb:
bag out
To quit or abandon an activity.
Idioms:
bag and baggage
1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
bag it Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
in the bag
Assured of a successful outcome; virtually accomplished or won.

[Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi.]

bag′ful n.
bag′ger n.
References in classic literature ?
send him off, bag and baggage, by the train to-morrow
He belonged, he said, to a party of thirty hunters, who had just passed through the neighborhood, but whom he had abandoned in consequence of their ill treatment of a brother trapper; whom they had cast off from their party, and left with his bag and baggage, and an Indian wife into the bargain, in the midst of a desolate prairie.
The summer camp was being dismantled, and the tribe, bag and baggage, was preparing to go off to the fall hunting.