bag and baggage


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bag

 (băg)
n.
1.
a. A container of flexible material, such as paper, plastic, or leather, that is used for carrying or storing items.
b. A handbag; a purse.
c. A piece of hand luggage, such as a suitcase or satchel.
d. A pouchlike or sagging organ or part of the body, such as a cow's udder.
2. An object that resembles a pouch.
3. Nautical The sagging or bulging part of a sail.
4. The amount that a bag can hold.
5. An amount of game taken or legally permitted to be taken.
6. Baseball A base.
7. Slang An area of interest or skill: Cooking is not my bag.
8. Slang A woman considered ugly or unkempt.
v. bagged, bag·ging, bags
v.tr.
1. To put into a bag: bag groceries.
2. To cause to bulge like a pouch.
3. To capture or kill as game: bagged six grouse.
4. Informal
a. To gain; acquire: He bagged a profit from the sale.
b. To capture or arrest: was bagged for trespassing.
c. To accomplish or achieve: bagged a birdie with a long putt.
5. Slang
a. To fail to attend purposely; skip: bagged classes for the day and went to the beach.
b. To stop doing or considering; abandon: bagged the idea and started from scratch.
c. To terminate the employment of.
v.intr.
1. To pack items in a bag.
2. To hang loosely: The pants bag at the knees.
3. To swell out; bulge.
Phrasal Verb:
bag out
To quit or abandon an activity.
Idioms:
bag and baggage
1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
bag it Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
in the bag
Assured of a successful outcome; virtually accomplished or won.

[Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi.]

bag′ful n.
bag′ger n.
References in classic literature ?
Another milestone was the departure of the Simpsons from Riverboro, bag and baggage, the banquet lamp being their most conspicuous posses- sion.
He is asked to help himself to two uncommonly comfortable things in their way -a fortune and a wife; he is allowed six months to get the wife in (we should have got her, in the Navy, bag and baggage, in six days); he has a round dozen of nice girls, to my certain knowledge, in one part of the country and another, all at his disposal to choose from, and what does he do?
Japan was thanked for her kindly aid and flung out bag and baggage by her gigantic protege.