bag lady

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bag lady

n. Slang
A homeless woman, especially one in a big city, who carries her possessions with her, as in a shopping bag.

bag lady

n
a woman who is homeless and wanders city streets with all her possessions in shopping bags. Also called (in full): shopping bag lady

bag′ la`dy


n.
a homeless woman who lives in public places, often keeping her belongings with her in shopping bags.
[1975–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bag lady - a homeless woman who carries all her possessions with her in shopping bagsbag lady - a homeless woman who carries all her possessions with her in shopping bags
homeless, homeless person - someone unfortunate without housing; "a homeless was found murdered in Central Park"
Translations
المُتَشَرِّدات، نِساءُ الحَقائِب
bezdomovkyně
posedame
hajléktalan nõ
bezdomovkyňa
kadın berduş

bag lady

nStadtstreicherin f (die ihre gesamte Habe in Einkaufstaschen mit sich führt)

bag lady

n (fam) → stracciona, barbona

bag

(bӕg) noun
1. a container made of soft material (eg cloth, animal skin, plastic etc). She carried a small bag.
2. a quantity of fish or game caught. Did you get a good bag today?
verbpast tense, past participle bagged
1. to put into a bag.
2. to kill (game).
ˈbaggy adjective
loose, like an empty bag. He wears baggy trousers.
bags of
a large amount of. He's got bags of money.
in the bag
as good as done or complete (in the desired way). Your appointment is in the bag.
ˈbag lady noun
a homeless woman who carries around with her all her belongings, usually in shopping bags. Bag ladies often sleep on benches in public parks and railway stations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meet the Bag Ladies of the World, whose acronym is, yes, BLOW.
Lupus Foundation's sixth annual New York Bag Ladies Luncheon.
com Every tin of Bag Ladies Tea contains 25 sachets of English breakfast tea, each with a witty quote or saying.
But the supermodel hasn't always had such a super sense of style - and as a teenager she and her pals looked more like bag ladies.
The article cites a survey of 1,925 women by a large insurance company, to which 46 percent of respondents said they feared becoming bag ladies.