bailiff


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bail·iff

 (bā′lĭf)
n.
1. A court attendant entrusted with duties such as the maintenance of order in a courtroom during a trial.
2. An official who assists a British sheriff and who has the power to execute writs, processes, and arrests.
3. Chiefly British An overseer of an estate; a steward.

[Middle English baillif, from Old French baillis, baillif-, overseer of an estate, steward, from Medieval Latin *bāiulīvus, from Latin bāiulus, carrier.]

bail′iff·ship′ n.

bailiff

(ˈbeɪlɪf)
n
1. (Professions) Brit the agent or steward of a landlord or landowner
2. (Professions) a sheriff's officer who serves writs and summonses, makes arrests, and ensures that the sentences of the court are carried out
3. (Law) chiefly Brit (formerly) a high official having judicial powers
4. (Professions) chiefly US an official having custody of prisoners appearing in court
[C13: from Old French baillif, from bail custody; see bail1]

bail•iff

(ˈbeɪ lɪf)

n.
1. an officer, similar to a sheriff, employed to keep order in the court, make arrests, etc.
2. (in Britain) a person charged with local administrative authority, or the chief magistrate in a town.
3. (esp. in Britain) an overseer of a landed estate or farm.
[1250–1300; Middle English baillif < Old French, derivative of bail custody; see bail1]
bail′iff•ship`, n.

bailiff

An official of a court, especially one who maintains order or is in charge of prisoners.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
Translations
ammanbaljuwdrossaarddrostgerechtsdeurwaarder

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] N
1. (Jur) → alguacil m
2. (on estate) → administrador(a) m/f

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n
(in law court)huissier/ière m/f; (for evictions)huissier/ière m/f
to send in the bailiffs → envoyer l'huissier

bailiff

n
(Jur) (Brit: also sheriff’s bailiff) → Amtsdiener(in) m(f); (Brit: for property) → Gerichtsvollzieher(in) m(f); (US: in court) → Gerichtsdiener(in) m(f)
(Brit: on estate) → (Guts)verwalter(in) m(f), → Landvogt(in) m(f) (obs)

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n (Law) → ufficiale m giudiziario; (on estate) → amministratore m, fattore m
References in classic literature ?
She agreed with the easy philosophy of the bailiff, already recorded in these pages: "They're only children.
He became convinced that my mother was acting like a fool; that the bailiff (a faithful servant, if ever there was one yet) was cunningly advancing his own interests by means of his daughter; and that I was a young idiot, who had developed his native reserves of imbecility at an unusually early period of life.
The morning came when Mary and I went out with Dermody, the bailiff, to see the last wild fowl of the season lured into the decoy; and still the welcome home waited for the master, and waited in vain.
The bailiff came in, and said everything, thank God, was doing well; but informed him that the buckwheat in the new drying machine had been a little scorched.
I'll come and look at her," he said to the bailiff.
he said to the bailiff, quite forgiving him for the buckwheat under the influence of his delight in the calf.
Some years later, on the Monday as it might be, my lady says, "Sir John, your bailiff is a stupid old man.
As for me, I went on with my business as bailiff year after year up to Christmas 1847, when there came a change in my life.
He could not have gone far, sir bailiff," cried one of the archers, unslinging his bow.
It shall never be said, whilst I am bailiff of Southampton, that any waster, riever, draw-latch or murtherer came scathless away from me and my posse.
Four of the bailiff of the palace's sergeants, perfunctory guardians of all the pleasures of the people, on days of festival as well as on days of execution, stood at the four corners of the marble table.
Nothing was to be heard but imprecations on the Flemish, the provost of the merchants, the Cardinal de Bourbon, the bailiff of the courts, Madame Marguerite of Austria, the sergeants with their rods, the cold, the heat, the bad weather, the Bishop of Paris, the Pope of the Fools, the pillars, the statues, that closed door, that open window; all to the vast amusement of a band of scholars and lackeys scattered through the mass, who mingled with all this discontent their teasing remarks, and their malicious suggestions, and pricked the general bad temper with a pin, so to speak.