ballad


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bal·lad

 (băl′əd)
n.
1.
a. A narrative poem, often of folk origin and intended to be sung, consisting of simple stanzas and usually having a refrain.
b. The music for such a poem.
2. A popular song especially of a romantic or sentimental nature.

[Middle English balade, poem or song in stanza form, from Old French ballade, from Old Provençal balada, song sung while dancing, from balar, to dance, from Late Latin ballāre, to dance; see ball2.]

bal·lad′ic (bə-lăd′ĭk, bă-) adj.

ballad

(ˈbæləd)
n
1. (Music, other) a narrative song with a recurrent refrain
2. (Poetry) a narrative poem in short stanzas of popular origin, originally sung to a repeated tune
3. (Pop Music) a slow sentimental song, esp a pop song
[C15: from Old French balade, from Old Provençal balada song accompanying a dance, from balar to dance, from Late Latin ballāre; see ball2]

bal•lad

(ˈbæl əd)

n.
1. a simple song; air.
2. a simple narrative poem, esp. of folk origin, composed in short stanzas and adapted for singing.
3. a slow romantic or sentimental popular song.
[1350–1400; Middle English balade < Middle French < Old Provençal balada dance, dancing-song =bal(ar) to dance (< Late Latin ballāre; see ball2) + -ada -ade1]
bal•lad•ic (bəˈlæd ɪk) adj.

ballad

1. A narrative poem in short stanzas, often of folk origin and intended to be sung.
2. A narrative song, or piece in similar style.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ballad - a narrative song with a recurrent refrainballad - a narrative song with a recurrent refrain
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
minstrelsy - ballads sung by minstrels
2.ballad - a narrative poem of popular originballad - a narrative poem of popular origin  
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
Edda - either of two distinct works in Old Icelandic dating from the late 13th century and consisting of 34 mythological and heroic ballads composed between 800 and 1200; the primary source for Scandinavian mythology

ballad

noun song, saga, ditty, folk song, canzone one of the most beautiful ballads he ever wrote
Translations
قَصيدَةٌ قَصَصِيَّةٌ شعبيّة غِنائِيّه
baladapísnička
balladefolkevise
balladi
ballada
ballaîa
baladėsentimentali daina
balāde
populárna sentimentálna pieseň

ballad

[ˈbæləd] Nbalada f; (Spanish) → romance m, corrido m (Mex)

ballad

[ˈbæləd] n (= song) → ballade f

ballad

n (Mus, Liter) → Ballade f

ballad

[ˈbæləd] nballata

ballad

(ˈbӕləd) noun
a simple, often sentimental, song. Older people prefer ballads to pop music.
References in classic literature ?
Now we think of a ballad as a simple story told in verse.
A ballad is much shorter than a romance, and therefore much more easily learned and remembered.
These early ballads of the Chinese differ in feeling from almost all the ballad literature of the world.
The knight in the meantime, had brought the strings into some order, and after a short prelude, asked his host whether he would choose a sirvente in the language of oc, or a lai in the language of oui, or a virelai, or a ballad in the vulgar English.
A ballad, a ballad,'' said the hermit, ``against all the ocs and ouis of France.
And so he went on with the ballad as far as the lines:
Don Quixote was firmly persuaded that this was the Marquis of Mantua, his uncle, so the only answer he made was to go on with his ballad, in which he told the tale of his misfortune, and of the loves of the Emperor's son and his wife all exactly as the ballad sings it.
Thanks to this change of position, he was able to listen to the ballad with far less embarrassment than before.
Now just at midnight, every night, the lost heiress stood in the mouth of her cave, arrayed in white robes, and sang a little love ballad which her Crusader had made for her.
Then he sang an ancient ballad of the time of good King Arthur, called "The Marriage of Sir Gawaine," which you may some time read yourself, in stout English of early times; and as he sang, all listened to that noble tale of noble knight and his sacrifice to his king.
Was it on a Monday morning, when the butcher-boy had been to our house for orders, and bought a ballad of me, which, being unacquainted with the tune, I run it over to him?
The old ballad which tells of their fight says that they thought nothing for to flee, but stiffly for to stand.