balladmonger

balladmonger

(ˈbælədˌmʌŋɡə)
n
1. (Professions) (formerly) a seller of ballads, esp on broadsheets
2. (Poetry) derogatory a writer of mediocre poetry
References in periodicals archive ?
suggur 'bard, balladmonger, poet [archaic]' [no DEDR].
Thus although Christoganus is attacking contemporary playwriting in general, his remarks particularly refer to one very successful playwright, one who is a mere 'Balladmonger', whose plays appear to dominate the stage, are popular with the common sort of audience member, and are 'Rakt from the rotten imbers of stall jests'.
Just two guitars and a drummer, the band features balladmonger David Sanders, reunited with ex-Karma Resin guitarist/bandmate Ade, with a special appearance on drums from The Colosseum's number two soundman Chris "The Rock" Mock.
She observes that 'the figures of the ballad writer and balladmonger of Elizabethan and Stuart times are difficult to define clearly' (p.
Coventry's own balladmonger David Sanders (ex Karma Resin) is also at the club and sandwiched in the middle are Kid Gallahad.
Balladmonger Martin Parkers A briefe dissection of Germaines Affliction (entered SR 9 Feb.
Armstrong explains, 'there appears to be some rivalry, each tribe exchanging the effusions of its "balladmongers" for those of its neighbours' (in Green 1979:204), emphasising the value Noongar placed on the expressive quality of particular songs.
(35) Lokos notes that the satire against the "balladmongers" reflects the infestation of Spain by academician poetasters (93).
She quotes William Kemp's use of the term 'Shakerags' in his pamphlet Kemp's nine daies wonder to describe those of his fellow balladmongers who were attempting to cash in on his exploits by misrepresenting them(6) She also claims that 'to shake a stage was a commonly used term descriptive of a great Elizabethan actor's performance'(7) although the only example she gives at first seems to undermine her case.
One of the most difficult features of these texts is what the balladmongers call zahr 'flower', a kind of punning that occurs at the end of many lines.