ballaster

ballaster

(ˈbæləstə)
n
someone who supplies ballast for a ship; someone who ballasts
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ghazoul, Nocturnal Poetics: The Arabian Nights in Comparative Context (Cairo: American University in Cairo Press, 1996); Bridget Orr, Empire on the English Stage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001); and Ros Ballaster, Fabulous Orients: Fictions of the East in England, 1662-1785 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).
Despite its apparent insignificance, the barrenness of clones gains importance when analysed in relation to a fact that is usually forgotten in popular knowledge of the Arabian Nights, most probably due to its numerous variants and editions (Ballaster 2013, 49).
See ROSALIND BALLASTER, FABULOUS ORIENTS: FICTIONS OF THE EAST IN ENGLAND 1662-1785, at 202-03 (2005) ("The sinophobic name points to the centuries-old tradition in Europe of representing spoken Chinese as an incomprehensible and unpronounceable combination of sounds."); Oliver Kutz et al., Chinese Whispers and Connected Alignments, 689 CEUR WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS 25, 27 n.9 (2010) ("In the United States, 'Telephone' is the most common name for the game.
In her introduction to Sense and Sensibility, Ros Ballaster reaches
Behn helped to construct a pattern in fiction influencing later writers, including Delarivier Manley and Eliza Flaywood, by writing fiction that features erotic, private, and enclosed space for women to explore their hidden, taboo desires (Ballaster 76-84).
Getting off the train in Central Station, Mickey Ballaster had a sense not only of having come north but of having gone back into his own past.
Marina Warner led a discussion that included comparativists Dominique Jullien, Ros Ballaster, LAL International Advisory Board member Wen-chin Ouyang, and Matthew Reynolds.
By providing a 'narrative history' (Ballaster et al., 1993: 5) of the magazines, this article augments the small amount of literature of this kind in Australian special-interest magazine studies.
Ballaster (ed.), The History of British Womens Writing, 1690-1750 (Basingstoke, 2010) and E.
Such visions accentuate the real life menace of Mortimer Winslow, a private agent hired by the Rossetti's to recover the stolen sketches, and his henchman, the prizefighter Monk Ballaster, who always seem to drift in and around the events of Stillman's daily life.
(19.) On the Western image of the harem, see Kabbani 1986; Lytle Croutier 1989; Mernissi 1997, 2001, 2003; Yeazell 2000; Lewis 2004; Ballaster 2005.
He has trouble with his finances, though, and when his debt begins to build he takes on a request from a rich widow, Doris Ballaster, who offers to take care of that debt if he can successfully prove that the Shroud of Turin, thought to be the burial shroud of Jesus Christ, is a forgery.