balm-of-Gilead

balm′-of-Gil′ead



n.
1. any of several plants of the genus Commiphora, of the bursera family, esp. C. opobalsamum and C. meccanensis, which yield a fragrant oleoresin.
2. the resin itself, a turbid, viscid liquid used chiefly in perfumery.
3. a hybrid North American poplar, Populus gileadensis, cultivated as a shade tree.
[1695–1705]
References in periodicals archive ?
x candicans 'Aurora'), popular name Balm-of-Gilead, a deciduous poplar tree with stunning white, green and pink heart-shaped leaves, in her garden.
TROUBLE: The ornamental poplar Populus x jackii 'Aurora' popular name Balm-of-Gilead, a deciduous tree with stunning white, green and pink heart-shaped leaves
According to Donald Culross Peattie, author of A Natural History of Western Trees, "Formerly the Algonquin Indians used to make canoes of paper birch, sewed with the long tough cords of Tamarack root and stretched over a frame of white cedar, while the thread holes and the seams were caulked with resin of pine or balsam or Balm-of-Gilead.