bandit


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ban·dit

 (băn′dĭt)
n.
1. A robber, especially one who robs at gunpoint.
2. An outlaw; a gangster.
3. One who cheats or exploits others.
4. Slang A hostile aircraft, especially a fighter aircraft.
Idiom:
make out like a bandit Slang
To be highly successful in a given enterprise.

[Italian bandito, from past participle of bandire, to proclaim, proscribe, banish, probably of Germanic origin; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

ban′dit·ry n.

bandit

(ˈbændɪt)
n, pl -dits or -ditti (-ˈdɪtɪ)
a robber, esp a member of an armed gang; brigand
[C16: from Italian bandito, literally: banished man, from bandire to proscribe, from bando edict, ban1]
ˈbanditry n

ban•dit

(ˈbæn dɪt)

n., pl. ban•dits (Rare) ban•dit•ti (bænˈdɪt i)
1. a robber, esp. a member of a gang or marauding band.
2. an outlaw.
3. Informal. a person who takes unfair advantage of others.
[1585–95; < Italian banditi outlaws, pl. of bandito, past participle of bandire to banish, announce publicly < Gothic bandwjan to make a sign, indicate (see band1)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bandit - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a bandbandit - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

bandit

noun robber, gunman, crook, outlaw, pirate, raider, gangster, plunderer, mugger (informal), hijacker, looter, highwayman, racketeer, desperado, marauder, brigand, freebooter, footpad Reports say he was killed in an attack by armed bandits.

bandit

noun
Translations
قاطِع طَريق، لِص
bandita
banditrøver
bandita
ræningi
banditas
bandīts
razbojnikropar
eşkiyahaydut

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] Nbandido m
see also one-armed

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] n (= outlaw) → bandit m

bandit

nBandit(in) m(f), → Räuber(in) m(f)

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] nbandito, brigante m

bandit

(ˈbӕndit) noun
an outlaw or robber, especially as a member of a gang. They were attacked by bandits in the mountains.
References in classic literature ?
said he, "I have travelled through Sicily and Calabria -- I have sailed two months in the Archipelago, and yet I never saw even the shadow of a bandit or a pirate.
Sometimes I amuse myself by delivering some bandit or criminal from the bonds of the law.
Your excellency is mistaken; there are pirates, like the bandits who were believed to have been exterminated by Pope Leo XII.
He aimed a terrible blow at D'Artagnan, who avoided it by springing to one side; but by this movement he left a passage free to the bandit, who darted off toward the bastion.
But," cried the bandit, "that is only another way of killing me.
cried the bandit, throwing himself upon his knees and leaning upon his hand--for he began to lose his strength with his blood.
Because he repents of living in bad company," said Gourville, "and prefers you to all his bandits.
The bandits whom the abbe keeps in pay and drink have their useful side, have they?
Let the circumstance arise, monseigneur, and you will be very glad to have these bandits under your hand.
And clear across to the Atlantic, the Junta in touch with them all and all of them needing guns, mere adventurers, soldiers of fortune, bandits, disgruntled American union men, socialists, anarchists, rough-necks, Mexican exiles, peons escaped from bondage, whipped miners from the bull-pens of Coeur d'Alene and Colorado who desired only the more vindictively to fight--all the flotsam and jetsam of wild spirits from the madly complicated modern world.
The gigantic futility of humanity organized and befuddled by the bandits did not shock him.
I knew a New Yorker who was kidnapped for ransom by some Afghanistan bandits.