banjo

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ban·jo

 (băn′jō)
n. pl. ban·jos or ban·joes
A usually fretted stringed instrument having a narrow neck and a hollow circular body with a covering of plastic or stretched skin on which the bridge rests. The modern American banjo typically has four strings and often a short fifth string plucked with the thumb.

[Earlier banshaw, banjore, banjo, probably of African origin and akin to Kimbundu and Tshiluba mbanza, a plucked stringed instrument (probably also influenced by bandore).]

ban′jo·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

banjo

(ˈbændʒəʊ)
n, pl -jos or -joes
1. (Instruments) a stringed musical instrument with a long neck (usually fretted) and a circular drumlike body overlaid with parchment, plucked with the fingers or a plectrum
2. slang any banjo-shaped object, esp a frying pan
3. (Tools) slang Austral and NZ a long-handled shovel with a wide blade
4. (modifier) banjo-shaped: a banjo clock.
[C18: variant (US Southern pronunciation) of bandore]
ˈbanjoist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ban•jo

(ˈbæn dʒoʊ)

n., pl. -jos, -joes.
a musical instrument of the guitar family, having a circular body covered in front with tightly stretched parchment and played with the fingers.
[1730–40]
ban′jo•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular bodybanjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular body
fingerboard - a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
stringed instrument - a musical instrument in which taut strings provide the source of sound
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
bendžo
banjo
banjo
bendžo
bendzsó
banjó
バンジョー
밴조
bandža
bandžo
bandżobanjo
bendžo
banjo
แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี
bancobançobanjo
đàn banjô

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] N (banjoes (banjos (pl))) → banjo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] [banjoes or banjos] (pl) n (= musical instrument) → banjo m
to play the banjo → jouer du banjo
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

banjo

n pl <-es or (US) -s> → Banjo nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] nbanjo m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

banjo

(ˈbӕndʒou) plural ˈbanjo(e)s noun
a stringed musical instrument similar to the guitar. He plays the banjo; Play me a tune on the banjo.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

banjo

آلة البانْـجو الـموسِيقِيَّة bendžo banjo Banjo μπάντζο banjo banjo banjo bendžo banjo バンジョー 밴조 banjo banjo bandżo banjo банджо banjo แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี banço đàn banjô 班卓琴
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
You could tell it was classical, because the banjo players were leaning back and chewing gum; and in New York restaurants only death or a classical speciality can stop banjoists.
Mazzy is a traditional jazz banjoists and vocalist.
Betse's former band The Wilders were a huge hit when they performed at the Tolbooth before and she is back with her new partner Clarke Wyatt, an engaging finger-style banjo player, drawing inspiration from great traditional and inventive banjoists of earlier decades such as Mike Seeger and John Hartford.
Salyer, born in 1882, was master of an older eastern Kentucky style that is only barely discernible in the playing of present-day fiddlers and banjoists. The recordings were made by his sons using a home disc-cutting machine; many of his tunes were not documented elsewhere.