banner


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ban·ner

 (băn′ər)
n.
1.
a. A piece of cloth attached to a staff and used as a standard by a monarch, military commander, or knight.
b. The flag of a nation, state, or army.
2. A piece of cloth bearing a motto or legend, as of a club.
3.
a. A headline spanning the width of a newspaper page.
b. A rectangular space with text or graphics, especially an advertisement, running across the top of a webpage or other online document.
4. Botany See standard.
adj.
Unusually good; outstanding: a banner year for the company.
tr.v. ban·nered, ban·ner·ing, ban·ners
1. To supply with banners.
2. To give a banner headline to (a story or item) in a newspaper.

[Middle English banere, from Old French baniere, from Vulgar Latin *bandāria, from Late Latin bandum, of Germanic origin; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

banner

(ˈbænə)
n
1. a long strip of flexible material displaying a slogan, advertisement, etc, esp one suspended between two points
2. a placard or sign carried in a procession or demonstration
3. something that represents a belief or principle: a commitment to nationalization was the banner of British socialism.
4. (Heraldry) the flag of a nation, army, etc, used as a standard or ensign
5. (Heraldry) (formerly) the standard of an emperor, knight, etc
6. (Journalism & Publishing) Also called: banner headline a large headline in a newspaper, etc, extending across the page, esp the front page
7. (Computer Science) an advertisement, often animated, that extends across the width of a web page
8. (Heraldry) a square flag, often charged with the arms of its bearer
vb
(Journalism & Publishing) (tr) (of a newspaper headline) to display (a story) prominently
adj
US outstandingly successful: a banner year for orders.
[C13: from Old French baniere, of Germanic origin; compare Gothic bandwa sign; influenced by Medieval Latin bannum ban1, bannīre to banish]
ˈbannered adj

ban•ner

(ˈbæn ər)

n.
1. the flag of a country, army, troop, etc.
2. an ensign or the like bearing some device, motto, or slogan, as one carried in religious processions or political demonstrations.
3. a flag formerly used as the standard of a sovereign, lord, or knight.
4. a sign painted on cloth and hung over a street, entrance, etc.
5. anything regarded or displayed as a symbol of principles.
6. a headline in large, bold type across the top of a newspaper page.
7. a streamer with lettering, towed behind an airplane for advertising purposes.
adj.
8. leading or foremost; outstanding: a banner year for crops.
[1200–50; Middle English banere < Old French baniere < Late Latin bann(um) (variant of bandum standard < Germanic, compare Gothic bandwa sign; see band1) + Old French -iere < Latin -āria -ary]
ban′nered, adj.
ban′ner•less, adj.
ban′ner•like`, adj.

Banner

 a body of men or troops who follow a banner; a group of knights.
Example: banner of horse, 1818.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banner - long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertisingbanner - long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertising
flag - emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
2.banner - a newspaper headline that runs across the full pagebanner - a newspaper headline that runs across the full page
headline, newspaper headline - the heading or caption of a newspaper article
3.banner - any distinctive flagbanner - any distinctive flag      
flag - emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
oriflamme - a red or orange-red flag used as a standard by early French kings
Adj.1.banner - unusually goodbanner - unusually good; outstanding; "a banner year for the company"
superior - of high or superior quality or performance; "superior wisdom derived from experience"; "superior math students"

banner

noun flag, standard, colours, jack, placard, pennant, ensign, streamer, burgee, pennon, banderole, fanion, gonfalon A big banner was draped across one of the streets.

banner

noun
Fabric used especially as a symbol:
adjective
Translations
رايَه، عَلَمشِعارعلم
praportransparentzástava
bannerfane
erakordnelahingulippstandart
banderollilippustandaaritunnus
kitűnőkiválólobogó
áróîursborîiflagg, fáni
transparantasvėliava
karogstransparents
lepaknapis
banderollfanastandar
biểu ngữ

banner

[ˈbænəʳ]
A. N (= flag) → bandera f; (= placard) → pancarta f
B. CPD banner ad N (Internet) → banner m
banner headlines NPLgrandes titulares mpl

banner

[ˈbænər] n
(= flag) → bannière f
under the banner of sth (in support of sth)sous les étendards de qch
(on web page)bannière f Webbanner headline n (in newspaper)gros titre m

banner

nBanner nt (also fig); (in processions) → Transparent nt, → Spruchband nt

banner

[ˈbænəʳ] nstendardo, bandiera; (with slogan) → striscione m

banner

(ˈbӕnə) noun
1. a military flag.
2. a large strip of cloth bearing a slogan etc. Many of the demonstrators were carrying banners.
References in classic literature ?
Bright were the days at Merry Mount, when the Maypole was the banner staff of that gay colony
Their dishonoured representative was driving up from the railway station in a coach- and-four, with music and a banner.
From his neck to his knees, in ample folds, a robe swept down that was a very star-spangled banner of curved and sinuous bars of black and white.
Each carried a strange banner swung from stem to stern above the upper works, and upon the prow of each was painted some odd device that gleamed in the sunlight and showed plainly even at the distance at which we were from the vessels.
When they see me, when they behold the banner of France, they will rally round me, for they will comprehend that I have your support.
Archers from the New Forest and the Forest of Bere, billmen from the pleasant country which is watered by the Stour, the Avon, and the Itchen, young cavaliers from the ancient Hampshire houses, all were pushing for Christchurch to take service under the banner of the five scarlet roses.
Today he fights beneath the banner of one master, tomorrow beneath that of another.
Nor can ordinary objects be seen clearly enough: hence the institution of banners and flags.
Prince Edward was the first of the royal party to take the field, and as he issued from the castle with his gallant company, banners and pennons streaming in the breeze and burnished armor and flashing blade scintillating in the morning sunlight, he made a gorgeous and impressive spectacle as he hurled himself upon the Londoners, whom he had selected for attack because of the affront they had put upon his mother that day at London on the preceding July.
I think it is delightful," he said, referring to a diplomatic note that had been sent to Vienna with some Austrian banners captured from the French by Wittgenstein, "the hero of Petropol" as he was then called in Petersburg.
Presently there was a distant blare of military music; it came nearer, still nearer, and soon a noble cavalcade wound into view, glorious with plumed helmets and flashing mail and flaunting banners and rich doublets and horse-cloths and gilded spear- heads; and through the muck and swine, and naked brats, and joyous dogs, and shabby huts, it took its gallant way, and in its wake we followed.
Methinks there's a genius Roams in the mountains, Girdled with ivy And robed in wisteria, Lips ever smiling, Of noble demeanour, Driving the yellow pard, Tiger-attended, Couched in a chariot With banners of cassia, Cloaked with the orchid, And crowned with azaleas; Culling the perfume Of sweet flowers, he leaves In the heart a dream-blossom, Memory haunting.