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ban·ner

 (băn′ər)
n.
1.
a. A piece of cloth attached to a staff and used as a standard by a monarch, military commander, or knight.
b. The flag of a nation, state, or army.
2. A piece of cloth bearing a motto or legend, as of a club.
3.
a. A headline spanning the width of a newspaper page.
b. A rectangular space with text or graphics, especially an advertisement, running across the top of a webpage or other online document.
4. Botany See standard.
adj.
Unusually good; outstanding: a banner year for the company.
tr.v. ban·nered, ban·ner·ing, ban·ners
1. To supply with banners.
2. To give a banner headline to (a story or item) in a newspaper.

[Middle English banere, from Old French baniere, from Vulgar Latin *bandāria, from Late Latin bandum, of Germanic origin; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

banner

(ˈbænə)
n
1. a long strip of flexible material displaying a slogan, advertisement, etc, esp one suspended between two points
2. a placard or sign carried in a procession or demonstration
3. something that represents a belief or principle: a commitment to nationalization was the banner of British socialism.
4. (Heraldry) the flag of a nation, army, etc, used as a standard or ensign
5. (Heraldry) (formerly) the standard of an emperor, knight, etc
6. (Journalism & Publishing) Also called: banner headline a large headline in a newspaper, etc, extending across the page, esp the front page
7. (Computer Science) an advertisement, often animated, that extends across the width of a web page
8. (Heraldry) a square flag, often charged with the arms of its bearer
vb
(Journalism & Publishing) (tr) (of a newspaper headline) to display (a story) prominently
adj
US outstandingly successful: a banner year for orders.
[C13: from Old French baniere, of Germanic origin; compare Gothic bandwa sign; influenced by Medieval Latin bannum ban1, bannīre to banish]
ˈbannered adj

ban•ner

(ˈbæn ər)

n.
1. the flag of a country, army, troop, etc.
2. an ensign or the like bearing some device, motto, or slogan, as one carried in religious processions or political demonstrations.
3. a flag formerly used as the standard of a sovereign, lord, or knight.
4. a sign painted on cloth and hung over a street, entrance, etc.
5. anything regarded or displayed as a symbol of principles.
6. a headline in large, bold type across the top of a newspaper page.
7. a streamer with lettering, towed behind an airplane for advertising purposes.
adj.
8. leading or foremost; outstanding: a banner year for crops.
[1200–50; Middle English banere < Old French baniere < Late Latin bann(um) (variant of bandum standard < Germanic, compare Gothic bandwa sign; see band1) + Old French -iere < Latin -āria -ary]
ban′nered, adj.
ban′ner•less, adj.
ban′ner•like`, adj.

Banner

 a body of men or troops who follow a banner; a group of knights.
Example: banner of horse, 1818.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banner - long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertisingbanner - long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertising
flag - emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
2.banner - a newspaper headline that runs across the full pagebanner - a newspaper headline that runs across the full page
headline, newspaper headline - the heading or caption of a newspaper article
3.banner - any distinctive flagbanner - any distinctive flag      
flag - emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
oriflamme - a red or orange-red flag used as a standard by early French kings
Adj.1.banner - unusually goodbanner - unusually good; outstanding; "a banner year for the company"
superior - of high or superior quality or performance; "superior wisdom derived from experience"; "superior math students"

banner

noun flag, standard, colours, jack, placard, pennant, ensign, streamer, burgee, pennon, banderole, fanion, gonfalon A big banner was draped across one of the streets.

banner

noun
Fabric used especially as a symbol:
adjective
Translations
رايَه، عَلَمشِعارعلم
praportransparentzástava
bannerfane
erakordnelahingulippstandart
banderollilippustandaaritunnus
kitűnőkiválólobogó
áróîursborîiflagg, fáni
transparantasvėliava
karogstransparents
lepaknapis
banderollfanastandar
biểu ngữ

banner

[ˈbænəʳ]
A. N (= flag) → bandera f; (= placard) → pancarta f
B. CPD banner ad N (Internet) → banner m
banner headlines NPLgrandes titulares mpl

banner

[ˈbænər] n
(= flag) → bannière f
under the banner of sth (in support of sth)sous les étendards de qch
(on web page)bannière f Webbanner headline n (in newspaper)gros titre m

banner

nBanner nt (also fig); (in processions) → Transparent nt, → Spruchband nt

banner

[ˈbænəʳ] nstendardo, bandiera; (with slogan) → striscione m

banner

(ˈbӕnə) noun
1. a military flag.
2. a large strip of cloth bearing a slogan etc. Many of the demonstrators were carrying banners.
References in classic literature ?
Forts were erected at the different points that commanded the facilities of the route, and were taken and retaken, razed and rebuilt, as victory alighted on the hostile banners.
This was made evident, one day, when a political procession, with hundreds of flaunting banners, and drums, fifes, clarions, and cymbals, reverberating between the rows of buildings, marched all through town, and trailed its length of trampling footsteps, and most infrequent uproar, past the ordinarily quiet House of the Seven Gables.
Here palms, alpacas, and volcanoes; sun's disks and stars; ecliptics, horns-of-plenty, and rich banners waving, are in luxuriant profusion stamped; so that the precious gold seems almost to derive an added preciousness and enhancing glories, by passing through those fancy mints, so Spanishly poetic.
Presently there was a distant blare of military music; it came nearer, still nearer, and soon a noble cavalcade wound into view, glorious with plumed helmets and flashing mail and flaunting banners and rich doublets and horse-cloths and gilded spear- heads; and through the muck and swine, and naked brats, and joyous dogs, and shabby huts, it took its gallant way, and in its wake we followed.
When I at last took courage to return to the room, I found Estella sitting at Miss Havisham's knee, taking up some stitches in one of those old articles of dress that were dropping to pieces, and of which I have often been reminded since by the faded tatters of old banners that I have seen hanging up in cathedrals.
Looking back at the old town, with its one steep street climbing the white face of the chalk hill, I remembered what wonderful exotic women Thomas Hardy had found eating their hearts out behind the windows of dull country high streets, through which hung waving no banners of romance, outwardly as unpromising of adventure as the windows of the town I had left.
All in a moment through the gloom were seen Ten thousand Banners rise into the Air With Orient Colours waving: with them rose A Forrest huge of Spears: and thronging Helms Appear'd, and serried Shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable: Anon they move In perfect PHALANX to the Dorian mood Of Flutes and soft Recorders; such as rais'd To highth of noblest temper Hero's old Arming to Battel, and in stead of rage Deliberate valour breath'd, firm and unmov'd With dread of death to flight or foul retreat, Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches, troubl'd thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Ay, that was a day of cleaving of shields, when a hundred banners were bent forwards over the heads of the valiant, and blood flowed round like water, and death was held better than flight.
If only it were possible to assemble the hundred or more telephone buildings of New York in one vast plaza, and if the two thousand clerks and three thousand maintenance men and six thousand girl operators were to march to work each morning with bands and banners, then, perhaps, there might be the necessary quality of impressiveness by which any large idea must always be imparted to the public mind.
But not for all these entreaties did Don Quixote turn back; on the contrary he went on shouting out, "Ho, knights, ye who follow and fight under the banners of the valiant emperor Pentapolin of the Bare Arm, follow me all; ye shall see how easily I shall give him his revenge over his enemy Alifanfaron of the Trapobana.
It has rarely been attempted to be employed, but against the weaker members; and in most instances attempts to coerce the refractory and disobedient have been the signals of bloody wars, in which one half of the confederacy has displayed its banners against the other half.
It had never been given me to see such deadly accuracy of aim, and it seemed as though a little figure on one of the craft dropped at the explosion of each bullet, while the banners and upper works dissolved in spurts of flame as the irresistible projectiles of our warriors mowed through them.