bannet

bannet

(ˈbænɪt)
n
Scot a bonnet
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The contract also includes an optional tranche and supplementary benefits paid on the basis of a unit price schedule for the following services: - the dismantling, Transport, Reinstallation and return to service of an appliance on the same site with the same requirements as for the initial installation, - maintenance of a device for a period of three years after the warranty period, - the supply and delivery of spare parts, The provision of the device for arranging the operating station of an apparatus, - the supply, Delivery and installation of a bannet return device, - provision of additional banners.
47) Eve Tavor Bannet explains that this "other Robinson Crusoe" was "Less what Joyce called 'the symbol of British conquests' and the 'true prototype of the British colonist' than a representative of the often victimized British common man.
In her study of "Quixotes, Imitations, and Transatlantic Genres," Eve Bannet analyzes the importance of literary and epistolary models to the dissemination of culture and new forms of sociability in transatlantic cultures.
4) While acknowledging these caveats, we nonetheless agree with Bannet and Manning, who argue that transatlantic studies matter because "transatlantic relations were so central to Britons' and Americans' everyday lives, literary imaginations, and histories, and .
From Gershwin's 'Three Preludes' arranged by Jay Gach to the Frank Bannet arrangement of 'Fascinatin' Rhythm,' 'Embraceable You' and 'I Got Rhythm,' Constantino, accompanied by pianist Paguirigan, gave us a worthy showcase of the clarinet as a formidable instrument.
Representative discussions are found in EVE TAYLOR BANNET, STRUCTURALISM AND THE LOGIC OF DISSENT (1989) and MARK POSTER, CRITICAL THEORY AND POSTSTRUCTURALISM (1989).
Elizabeth Bannet, Sherlock Holmes, Peter Pan, Bertie Wooster, Hercule Poirot, James Bond and Asterix the Gaul: All have had a fictional afterlife unimagined by their creators.
Eve Bannet and Yael Shapira both explore from innovative transatlantic perspectives the under-examined role of the Jew in early American drama.
Bannet writes that 'the nation's public sphere decomposes into a multitude of disparate and self-governing localities' (366).
As Eve Tavor Bannet has recently shown, numerous works designated as secret histories in either their titles or subtitles were published during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in addition to many others "written as secret history and published as history" (376).
Richards, 'Theatre, Drama, Performance, in Eve Tavor Bannet and Susan Manning (eds), Transatlantic Literary Studies, 1660-1830 (Cambridge, 2012), 91-105, p.