barbarism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bar·ba·rism

 (bär′bə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The condition of having no civilizing influences or refined culture; ignorance or crudity: "the struggles made by different nations, as they emerge from barbarism, to supply themselves with some visible symbol of thought" (William Hickling Prescott).
b. Savage violence or cruelty: "To say that the barbarism of one side [in World War I] impelled the barbarism of the other is not much of an excuse" (David A. Bell).
2.
a. The use of words, forms, or expressions considered incorrect or unacceptable.
b. A specific word, form, or expression so used.

[Latin barbarismus, use of a foreign tongue or of one's own tongue amiss, barbarism, from Greek barbarismos, from barbarizein, to behave or speak like a barbarian, from barbaros, non-Greek, foreign (imitative of the sound of unintelligible speech).]

barbarism

(ˈbɑːbəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. a brutal, coarse, or ignorant act
2. the condition of being backward, coarse, or ignorant
3. (Linguistics) a substandard or erroneously constructed or derived word or expression; solecism
4. any act or object that offends against accepted taste
[C16: from Latin barbarismus error of speech, from Greek barbarismos, from barbaros barbarous]

bar•ba•rism

(ˈbɑr bəˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. a barbarous or uncivilized state or condition.
2. a barbarous act.
3. the use of words or constructions felt to be undesirably alien to the established standards of a language.
4. such a word or construction.
[1570–80; < Latin < Greek]

barbarism

the use of terms or constructions feit by some to be undesirably foreign to the established customs of the language. — barbarian, n., adj.
See also: Language Style

barbarism

An expression or use of words that is considered unacceptable or incorrect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barbarism - a brutal barbarous savage actbarbarism - a brutal barbarous savage act  
atrocity, inhumanity - an act of atrocious cruelty

barbarism

barbarism

noun
A term that offends against established usage standards:
Translations

barbarism

[ˈbɑːbərɪzəm] N
1. (= cruelty) → barbarie f
2. (Gram) → barbarismo m

barbarism

[ˈbɑːrbərɪzəm] n (= savagery) → barbarie f

barbarism

n
(Hist, fig) → Barbarei f
(Ling) → Barbarismus m

barbarism

[ˈbɑːbəˌrɪzəm] n (of society) → barbarie f inv, barbarismo
References in classic literature ?
If he struggled up from barbarism, and still more remotely from the lower Primates, his ideal should be to surpass man himself and reach Superman (see especially the Prologue).
He maintained, with peculiar satisfaction, it seemed, that maiden modesty is a mere relic of barbarism, and that nothing could be more natural than for a man still youngish to handle a young girl naked.
Among our still more modern and dashing young gentlemen -- who are extremely averse to superfluous effort and supremely indifferent to the purity of their native language -- the formula is still further curtailed by the use of "to feel" in a technical sense, meaning, "to recommend-for-the-purposes-of-feeling-and-being-felt"; and at this moment the "slang" of polite or fast society in the upper classes sanctions such a barbarism as "Mr.
Monsters such as he is belong to an earlier and more rudimentary stage of barbarism.
And at last he says: "As barbarism crept in they were no longer called Britons, but Welsh, a word derived either from Gualo, one of their dukes, or from Guales, their Queen, or else from their being barbarians.
It ought to be considered as a great point gained in favor of humanity, that a period of twenty years may terminate forever, within these States, a traffic which has so long and so loudly upbraided the barbarism of modern policy; that within that period, it will receive a considerable discouragement from the federal government, and may be totally abolished, by a concurrence of the few States which continue the unnatural traffic, in the prohibitory example which has been given by so great a majority of the Union.
Pfuel and his adherents demanded a retirement into the depths of the country in accordance with precise laws defined by a pseudo-theory of war, and they saw only barbarism, ignorance, or evil intention in every deviation from that theory.
It was as if the Old-World barbarism and the New-World civilization had reconciled their differences by the arbitration of an impartial decay--as is the way of civilizations.
These men, whom she had found so relapsed into barbarism that they had forgotten the most ordinary forms of civilization; these men, even in whose extravagant admiration there was a certain loss of self-respect, that as a woman she would never forgive; these men, who seemed to belong to another race--impossible
Our system is educating them in barbarism and brutality.
It was too horrible a confusion of guilt, too gross a complication of evil, for human nature, not in a state of utter barbarism, to be capable of
Despite the touches of barbarism in his contours, there was a singular force in the gentleman's face, and in his bold rolling eye.