bardie

bardie

(ˈbɑːdiː)
n
1. (Animals) Also called: bardy an edible white wood-boring grub of Australia
2. starve the bardies! slang Austral an exclamation of surprise or protest
[from a native Australian language]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The likes of supermodel Adriana Lima and Hailey Baldwin have already jumped aboard the Team Bardie train, while Team Minaj has found a sympathetic ear with 50 Cent, Vanessa Hudgens and Azealia Banks; although, we're still on the fence whether Banks actually supports Minaj or just hates Cardi B.
(4) However, the peculiarities of capitalist development in Australasia encouraged readings of the 'simple, country bardie' (5) as both a poet with a 'radical political dynamic' and as a lowly innocent.
(32) The Fast Breeder reactors comprising the defense usage were eight in number while fourteen nuclear reactors were kept aside for the safeguards and verification regime sponsored by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) led by Mohammad Al Bardie. Some regarded the deal as a big gain for India, as it would leave New Delhi free to continue its nuclear improvement.
Accept a Bardie's gratefu' thanks!" Rabbie Burns immortalised the tipple in his poem Scotch Drink and - alongside poetry, pipers and haggis - it remains key to Burns Night celebrations more than 200 years after his death.
The adoption of international literary genres such as the ballad and the romance; and the reformulation or poetic norms with the rise of the later bardie schools.
Born in 1874, Katherine 'Kitty' Murray, went on to marry 'Bardie', the Marquis of Tullibardine.
* Volunteer of the Year: Bardie Scarbrough, Wilder Construction Co., Anchorage;
(11) Robert Crawford, Devolving English Literature (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), comments on Burns's use of local river names: "The use of place-names and dialect forces readers to consider the text's local origin as part of the poem's meaning, its assertion that the bardie's apparently obscure, small culture may be valued at least as much as the poet's grand, celebrated one" (p.
(13) The vestiges of the formula are preserved in Burns's "Lines on Meeting with Lord Daer" (1786): "But O, for Hogarth's magic pow'r / To show Sir Bardie's willyart [disordered] glowr, / An' how he star'd an' stammer'd" (Burns 2:51).
But is this hypothetical bardie oral tradition the extent of the "proofe we can produce"?