bardolatrous

bardolatrous

(ˌbɑːˈdɒlətrəs)
adj
relating to or characterized by bardolatry
References in periodicals archive ?
But Lesser argues that Collier, Halliwell, and Knight took their opposing positions because of their shared Romantic convictions: not only their Bardolatrous belief in Shakespeare's poetic demi-divinity, but their shared insistence on great art's organic nature.
Setting aside their obvious bardolatrous ideologies, the games have pedagogical value insofar as they familiarize their users with various aspects involved in the process of making theater such that when game players attend an actual Shakespeare performance, they would arguably be more critically and emotionally engaged in what they see.
Virginia Woolf, no bardophile herself, was the rebellious daughter of a deeply bardolatrous, imperialist, and sexually conservative Victorian England.
Commercially unsuccessful but critically influential, Pope was both the instigator and the most extreme example of the Bardolatrous attitude towards Shakespeare in eighteenth-century editorial practice.
When the real is shown to be at best ordinary and at worst hollow, we can abandon our bardolatrous fantasies and acknowledge the historical facts in front of us.
Various factors would tempt him: the synonymy of Globe and 'Totus Mundus', Farewel Folly's echoes of As You Like It, and Oldys's own bardolatrous desire to connect with Shakespeare.
10) The burlesque, according to Richard Schoch, served to redirect Shakespeare's language toward non-Shakespearean concerns and exposed "the fragility of official Bardolatrous culture.
The best Balmanno can hope for is a kind of partial second-order fulfillment of his bardolatrous desires: a glance at Anne Shakespeare's cleavage, a few half-preserved shreds and patches of her speech.
Bate sees the riots "as a battle for the possession of Shakespeare" (43); Shakespeare's plays made up a signif part of the repertory at Covent Garden and the riots equally "had economic, as well as Bardolatrous, motivations" (45).
Although the more mature playwright will wrap these anxious contradictions in textual plenitude, this early play exposes the rudimentary structures that preclude, even from the most bardolatrous, humanistic appeals to some essential "truth" about the comic "nature" of "man.
This is no bardolatrous plea to simply photograph a staged presentation of the text; Orson Welles' attempt at a free re-creation of Shakespeare in properly cinematic terms is the best, if also the most demanding, approach.
Linguistic and bardolatrous barriers to enjoying comic scenes present a continual frustration in teaching Shakespearean drama; Paul Rogers's hilarious, and plausibly Elizabethan, Bottom in the 1968 Peter Hall Royal Shakespeare Company film elicits few chuckles without extensive teacherly intervention.