bardolatry


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bardolatry

(bɑːˈdɒlətrɪ)
n
facetious idolatry or excessive admiration of William Shakespeare

bard•ol•at•ry

(bɑrˈdɒl ə tri)
n.
worship or idolization of Shakespeare.
[1900–05; Bard (of Avon) + -o- + -latry]
bard•ol′at•er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bardolatry - the idolization of William Shakespeare
idolisation, idolization - the act of worshiping blindly and to excess
References in periodicals archive ?
But if this outrageous example of early Bardolatry sets Shakespeare apart from any individual contemporary, it is Digges himself, who wrote primarily as a translator and had an intimate understanding of the dynamics between originals and translations as well as those between authors and translators.
At its heart lies a sequence of vocal solos (and one delightful duet) interspersed by a lengthy Shakespeare-quoting piece of bardolatry by Garrick himself, elegantly (legs nicely turned) if occasionally muffledly declaimed by Samuel West.
The occasion was reading (in That Shakespeherian Rag) his virtuoso deconstruction of the language of early twentieth-century bardolatry that culminated in the image of Shakespeare as "Phallus in Wonderland.
Despite Bate's disavowal of the term 'Apocrypha', his General Introduction is not short on bardolatry.
In Bloom's books, from The Western Canon to Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, he upholds Shakespeare's supreme position in the western canon and advocates a "secular religion" of bardolatry (Invention, xix).
It is, however, De Bruyn's comprehensive "Reference Guide" which, by virtue of its alignment with the volume's five main sections, provides an informal conclusion through thematically organised lists of the key published works (eighteenth-century and modern) and thumbnail biographies of the major editors, critics, actors, theatre managers and artists associated with the period's involved process of bardolatry.
This greasy and unkempt figure represents the antithesis of Bardolatry, allowing Woolf to poke fun at not only Shakespeare but also her poet-protagonist.
To the Disney Machine," according to Michael Modenessi's critique of the corporation's conservative aesthetic effect, "'Shakespeare' means leftovers of bardolatry freely circulating in ready-to-use packages" (2009, r86).
Schoch, Not Shakespeare: Bardolatry and Burlesque in the Nineteenth Century (Cambridge, 2002).
I preach Bardolatry as the most benign of all religions," Bloom writes, and that can mean fervent leaps of faith.
This is in part a failure to present the context of the earlier arguments against the author--in the wake of theory, along with the ever-present threat of bardolatry, the case had to be stated strongly.
Instead, I am arguing that we will have to dispense with the cultural force of Bardolatry before we can advance creating and enabling an oppositional gaze for blackface performances.