barfly

(redirected from barflies)
Also found in: Idioms.

bar·fly

 (bär′flī′)
n. pl. bar·flies Slang
One who frequents drinking establishments.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

barfly

(ˈbɑːflaɪ)
n, pl -flies
informal a person who frequents bars
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bar•fly

(ˈbɑrˌflaɪ)

n., pl. -flies.
Slang. a person who frequents barrooms.
[1905–10, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

barfly

[ˈbɑːflaɪ] N (US) → culo m de café
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

barfly

[ˈbɑːrflaɪ] (US) npilier m de bistrotbar food n (= pub food) → cuisine f de brasserie
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

barfly

n (inf)Kneipenhocker(in) m(f) (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
A huge sell-out success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2009, Barflies is drawn from the short stories and poems of cult American writer Charles Bukowski and is a rumbustious encounter with his alter-ego Henry Chinaski and a bevvy of the women who shaped his life and work.
Human caring abounds with tall tales that lead the barflies to throw their glasses into the fireplace as a tribute to the acceptance of this bizarre blend of aliens, humans, time travelers, and even a talking dog.
From the spastic, oddly-proportioned freaks in Us Kids to the grinning, sexually charged barflies in Green Bottle, (both undated), Serl achieves the kind of figural rawness coveted by Modern painters from Paul Klee to Jean Dubuffet.