barn swallow


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barn swallow

n.
A widely distributed bird (Hirundo rustica) that nests in barns and caves and has a deeply forked tail, a dark-blue back, and tan underparts.

barn swallow

n
(Animals) the US and Canadian name for the common swallow, Hirundo rustica. See swallow2

barn′ swal`low


n.
a common swallow, Hirundo rustica, of North America and Eurasia, that builds mud nests on the ledges and walls of buildings.
[1780–90, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barn swallow - common swallow of North America and Europe that nests in barns etc.barn swallow - common swallow of North America and Europe that nests in barns etc.
swallow - small long-winged songbird noted for swift graceful flight and the regularity of its migrations
genus Hirundo, Hirundo - type genus of the Hirundinidae
Translations
Rauchschwalbe
rondine comune
jaskółka dymówka
References in periodicals archive ?
By contrast, a barn swallow catching a mouthful of insects isn't newsworthy, nor is the act viewed as ferocious or cruel.
Juan Tapia fitted a ripped oil painting around a gap in his barn wall, and photographed a barn swallow flying through it, to create a strange image.
As well as the Swallow theme this year, every season by posting their first sightings of Barn Swallow, White Stork, Common Cuckoo, Common Swift, and European Bee-eater on the www.
Barn swallow | Pic: Derek Moore IT is a quintessential image of late summer.
Ormston (2001) studied colonies in the same area and found only one instance of a mixed colony of barn swallows and cave swallows, and that colony contained only a single barn swallow nest.
THE BARN SWALLOW (Hirundo rustica) is one of the most widely recognized species of bird in the world.
Aberrant feathers were found on local barn swallow populations.
The predictive performance of STEM and AdaSTEM were compared using distribution estimates for Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) in (Fink, Damoulas, and Dave 2013).
The little Model 60 wasn't the fanciest, but it made a great tool for thinning the local blackbird and barn swallow population.
Bottom right: Barn swallow, by Scott Molesworth Right: Geese, by Bill Shakespeare Top right: Canal skyline, by jowoody Top left: Mailbox tennis court, by Tim Cornbill
Given that there was also no trend in breeding output relative to latitude or date, and given that most of the cited studies were short term (one or two years), it seems unlikely that there is substantial difference among geographic localities in overall, long term reproductive performance among barn swallow populations in North America.
99) BIRDWATCHER Horatio Clare's mission to follow the migratory path of the common Barn Swallow may not be your usual bag of birdseed but that's no reason to let this excellent piece of travel writing fly past without a second glance.