baroness


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Related to baroness: Baroness Thatcher

baroness

the wife of a baron; a woman holding a baronial title in her own right
Not to be confused with:
barrenness – the state of being barren: the barrenness of the land

bar·on·ess

 (băr′ə-nĭs)
n.
1.
a. The wife or widow of a baron.
b. A woman holding the title to a barony.
2. Used as the title for such a noblewoman.

baroness

(ˈbærənɪs) or

baronne

n
1. (Heraldry) the wife or widow of a baron
2. (Heraldry) a woman holding the rank of baron in her own right

bar•on•ess

(ˈbær ə nɪs)

n.
1. the wife of a baron.
2. a woman holding a baronial title.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baroness - a noblewoman who holds the rank of baron or who is the wife or widow of a baronbaroness - a noblewoman who holds the rank of baron or who is the wife or widow of a baron
noblewoman, peeress, Lady - a woman of the peerage in Britain
Translations
paronitarvapaaherratar
bárókisasszonybárónébaroneszbárónő
baronienė
barónka
baronica
baronessa

baroness

[ˈbærənɪs] Nbaronesa f

baroness

[ˈbærənɛs] n (= noblewoman) → baronne f
Baroness Rothschild → la baronne de Rothschild

baroness

nBaronin f; (unmarried) → Baronesse f

baroness

[ˈbærənɪs] nbaronessa
References in classic literature ?
Baroness Shilton, a friend of Petritsky's, with a rosy little face and flaxen hair, resplendent in a lilac satin gown, and filling the whole room, like a canary, with her Parisian chatter, sat at the round table making coffee.
Baroness, some coffee for him out of the new coffee pot.
"I should think so," said Vronsky, with a bright smile, pressing the baroness's little hand.
'The baroness pointed, from the window at which they stood, to the courtyard beneath, where the unconscious Lincoln greens were taking a copious stirrup-cup, preparatory to issuing forth after a boar or two.
'Whereupon the baroness uttered a great cry, and swooned away at the baron's feet.
I remember that, as I approached the Baroness, I felt as excited as a schoolboy.
Those who can read German will find an excellent guide, in this respect, in Frau Foerster-Nietzsche's exhaustive and highly interesting biography of her brother: "Das Leben Friedrich Nietzsche's" (published by Naumann); while the works of Deussen, Raoul Richter, and Baroness Isabelle von Unger- Sternberg, will be found to throw useful and necessary light upon many questions which it would be difficult for a sister to touch upon.
de Treville and the guardroom of the Louvre with the accounts of his love scrapes, after having passed from professional ladies to military ladies, from the lawyer's dame to the baroness, there was question of nothing less with Porthos than a foreign princess, who was enormously fond of him.
"And you, my dear companion," said he, "you speak of the baronesses, countesses, and princesses of others?"
For the present, I will confine myself (if perfectly agreeable to you) to introducing you to the Baroness Danglars -- excuse my impatience, my dear count, but a client like you is almost like a member of the family." Monte Cristo bowed, in sign that he accepted the proffered honor; Danglars rang and was answered by a servant in a showy livery.
"I always regret our carriage on her account," remarked the baroness.
Already a septuagenarian, tall, withered, pale, and wrinkled, the baroness exactly resembled those old women whom Schnetz puts into the Italian scenes of his "genre" pictures.