baroquely


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Related to baroquely: Baroque style, Barroco, Late Baroque

ba·roque

 (bə-rōk′)
adj.
1. also Baroque Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style in art and architecture developed in Europe from the early 17th to mid-18th century, emphasizing dramatic, often strained effect and typified by bold, curving forms, elaborate ornamentation, and overall balance of disparate parts.
2. also Baroque Music Of, relating to, or characteristic of a style of composition that flourished in Europe from about 1600 to 1750, marked by expressive dissonance and elaborate ornamentation.
3. Extravagant, complex, or bizarre, especially in ornamentation: "the baroque, encoded language of post-structural legal and literary theory" (Wendy Kaminer).
4. Irregular in shape: baroque pearls.
n. also Baroque
The baroque style or period in art, architecture, or music.

[French, from Italian barocco, imperfect pearl, and from Portuguese barroco.]

ba·roque′ly adv.
ba·roque′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

baroquely

(bəˈrɒklɪ)
adv
in a baroque fashion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"In reality most people's cultures have evolved out of this mongrelization, but people don't acknowledge that." The word may initially seem an inapt one for Shonibare's sumptuous, baroquely elegant sculptures, videos, and installations, but it does conjure the fraught conditions of postcolonial identity, increasingly defined by discourses of globalization, that have long been the primary focus of his slyly provocative work.
(34) The most baroquely ornate of all such notations (ta 'amei ha-mikra), that sign is called shalshelet, meaning "chain of three," and marks one of only four such usages in the Pentateuch (additionally emphasized in this verse by a caesura or psik ta'ama).
The problem caused several deaths and was investigated thoroughly, yet no one was able definitively to explain exactly what went wrong in the baroquely complicated control software of the vehicles involved.
This is a test case for his argument that "el sentido de un mito es otro mito", where one story alludes to another, and then to another such that the baroquely interwoven set of stories becomes "un sistema en movimiento y perpetua metamorfosis: un lenguaje" (Claude 38).
A baroquely surrealist horror, starring Elle Fanning, Christina Hendricks and Keanu Reeves.
baroquely detailed committee systems akin to a board of directors in a
In the darker sound, it sinks in silence, and in the middle section it splendidly accelerates, so as to chime with the poignancy of the Baroquely wistful piety.
The law governing wrongful death actions for the estates of those who die at sea is a baroquely intricate tapestry that interweaves strands of both statutory and common law.
Stability goes out the window in these stories, and we are left with passive narrators (or passive protagonists) who under-react to otherworldly experiences with such deadpan precision that we can't help but feel the uncanny acutelysometimes baroquely so.
Instead, they relied on a 'baroquely complex legal system', allowing indigenous law and a variety of colonial jurisdictions to exist next to one another (Cribb 2011:35).
They don't have the marble heft of those in the German sedans' baroquely detailed, Old World cabins.
15-26), appeared originally in the New York Review of Books and takes as its central biographical premise the notion that "Hopkins' singular temperament, its odd mix of the naive and the baroquely convoluted" (p.