barouche

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Related to barouches: calash

ba·rouche

 (bə-ro͞osh′)
n.
A four-wheeled carriage with a collapsible top, two double seats inside facing each other, and a box seat outside in front for the driver.

[German Barutsche, from Italian biroccio, from Vulgar Latin *birotium, from Late Latin birotus, two-wheeled : Latin bi-, bi-; see dwo- in Indo-European roots + Latin rota, wheel; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

barouche

(bəˈruːʃ)
n
(Historical Terms) a four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage, popular in the 19th century, having a retractable hood over the rear half, seats inside for two couples facing each other, and a driver's seat outside at the front
[C19: from German (dialect) Barutsche, from Italian baroccio, from Vulgar Latin birotium (unattested) vehicle with two wheels, from Late Latin birotus two-wheeled, from bi-1 + rota wheel]

ba•rouche

(bəˈruʃ)

n.
a four-wheeled carriage with a high front seat for the driver, facing seats inside for two couples, and a calash top over the back seat.
[1795–1805; < dial. German Barutsche < Italian baroccio < Vulgar Latin *birotium < Late Latin birot(us) two-wheeled]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barouche - a horse-drawn carriage having four wheels; has an outside seat for the driver and facing inside seats for two couples and a folding top
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
Translations

barouche

nLandauer m
References in classic literature ?
Meantime, the cavalcade, the banners, the music, and the barouches swept past him, with the vociferous crowd in the rear, leaving the dust to settle down, and the Great Stone Face to be revealed again, with the grandeur that it had worn for untold centuries.
His carriage-house contained three splendid coaches, three or four gigs, besides dearborns and barouches of the most fashionable style.
A plain, but handsome, dark-green barouche had now drawn up in front of the ruinous portal of the old mansion-house.
Fastened up behind the barouche was a hamper of spacious dimensions--one of those hampers which always awakens in a contemplative mind associations connected with cold fowls, tongues, and bottles of wine--and on the box sat a fat and red-faced boy, in a state of somnolency, whom no speculative observer could have regarded for an instant without setting down as the official dispenser of the contents of the before-mentioned hamper, when the proper time for their consumption should arrive.
A shadow in a long black cloak and a soft black felt hat passed along the pavement between the Rotunda and the carriages, examined the barouche carefully, went up to the horses and the coachman and then moved away without saying a word, The magistrate afterward believed that this shadow was that of the Vicomte Raoul de Chagny; but I do not agree, seeing that that evening, as every evening, the Vicomte de Chagny was wearing a tall hat, which hat, besides, was subsequently found.
Lady Ruth, who drive by quickly in a barouche, almost rose from her seat; the Marchioness, whose victoria they passed, had time to wave her hand and flash a quick, searching glance at Juliet, who returned it with her dark eyes filled with admiration.
Henry, who is good-nature itself, has offered to fetch it in his barouche.
Her ladyship's carriage was a barouche, and did not hold more than four with any comfort.
Two hours later, every one knew that the great C-spring barouche in which Mrs.
Little Nap is a handsome boy, who sits chatting to his tutor, and kissed his hand to the people as he passes in his four-horse barouche, with postilions in red satin jackets and a mounted guard before and behind.
It reminded one a little of the London which Thackeray knew on that side of the river, and in the Kennington Road, through which the great barouche of the Newcomes must have passed as it drove the family to the West of London, the plane-trees were bursting into leaf.
I have a barouche and two bay horses, a coachman and page in neat liveries, three charming children, and a French governess, a boudoir and lady's-maid for my wife.