barrace

barrace

(ˈbɑːˌreɪs)
n
a barricade or barrier, particularly one in front of a castle or enclosing the grounds of a tournament
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
During the famous garden party scene in Henry James's The Ambassadors (1903), a group comprised of the freethinking Parisian Miss Barrace, the expatriate American artist Little Bilham, and the novel's itinerant hero Lambert Strether--who has been sent to retrieve the prodigal Chad Newsome from what his mother in Woollett, Massachusetts presumes is the clutch of a European temptress--discusses Paris's subversive effects on Americans abroad.
Qualifying this suggestion of Waymarsh's portability, Miss Barrace adds, "Certainly, if you mean by portable ...
The life of the occupant struck him of a sudden as more charged with possession even than Chad's or than Miss Barrace's; wide as his glimpse had lately become of the empire of "things," what was before him still enlarged it: the lust of the eyes and the pride of life had indeed thus their temple.
A perceptive, bright young man, Little Bilham becomes the confident of the ambassadors and, along with a friend, Miss Barrace, their interpreters of social and artistic life in Paris.
Miss Barrace, a shrewd, witty, understanding woman living in Paris.
Miss Barrace has unknowingly noted that Waymarsh's total Americanness is in itself a duplicate already.
Cantavam nas noites primevas, ainda arranchados nos 'barraces da Imigracao'.--Cantavam quando em grupos, os vares se embrenhavam na selva, em busca de suas 'colonias' para o desbocamento.