barrack


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bar·rack 1

 (băr′ək)
tr.v. bar·racked, bar·rack·ing, bar·racks
To house (soldiers, for example) in quarters.
n. often barracks
1. A building or group of buildings used to house military personnel.
2. A large, unadorned building used for temporary occupancy.

[From French baraque, hut made of planks, barrack, from Middle French barraque, ultimately (via Old Provençal baraca Old Spanish barraca) from Catalan barraca, hut, perhaps partly from a source akin to Spanish varga, thatched hut (of unknown origin) and partly from medieval Andalusian Arabic *barrāka, perhaps meaning "hut for resting beasts of burden" (from Arabic barraka, to make (a camel) kneel; akin to Akkadian birku and Hebrew berek, knee).]

bar·rack 2

 (băr′ək)
v. bar·racked, bar·rack·ing, bar·racks
v.intr.
1. Chiefly British To jeer or shout at a player, speaker, or team.
2. Australian To shout support for a team.
v.tr. Chiefly British
To shout against; jeer at.

[Perhaps from Irish dialectal barrack, to brag; akin to brag.]

bar′rack·er n.

barrack

(ˈbærək)
vb
(Military) to house (people, esp soldiers) in barracks

barrack

(ˈbærək)
vb
1. to criticize loudly or shout against (a player, team, speaker, etc); jeer
2. (foll by: for) to shout support (for)
[C19: from northern Irish: to boast]
ˈbarracker n
ˈbarracking n, adj

bar•rack1

(ˈbær ək)
n. Usu., barracks.
1. a building or group of buildings for lodging soldiers, esp. in garrison.
2. any large building in which many people are lodged.
v.t., v.i.
3. to lodge in barracks.
[1680–90; < French baraque, Middle French < Catalan barraca hut]

bar•rack2

(ˈbær ək)
Chiefly Brit.
v.i.
1. to jeer; scoff.
v.t.
2. to shout for or against, as a sports team.
[1885–90; orig. Australian E, perhaps < N Ireland dial. barrack to brag]
bar′rack•er, n.

barrack


Past participle: barracked
Gerund: barracking

Imperative
barrack
barrack
Present
I barrack
you barrack
he/she/it barracks
we barrack
you barrack
they barrack
Preterite
I barracked
you barracked
he/she/it barracked
we barracked
you barracked
they barracked
Present Continuous
I am barracking
you are barracking
he/she/it is barracking
we are barracking
you are barracking
they are barracking
Present Perfect
I have barracked
you have barracked
he/she/it has barracked
we have barracked
you have barracked
they have barracked
Past Continuous
I was barracking
you were barracking
he/she/it was barracking
we were barracking
you were barracking
they were barracking
Past Perfect
I had barracked
you had barracked
he/she/it had barracked
we had barracked
you had barracked
they had barracked
Future
I will barrack
you will barrack
he/she/it will barrack
we will barrack
you will barrack
they will barrack
Future Perfect
I will have barracked
you will have barracked
he/she/it will have barracked
we will have barracked
you will have barracked
they will have barracked
Future Continuous
I will be barracking
you will be barracking
he/she/it will be barracking
we will be barracking
you will be barracking
they will be barracking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been barracking
you have been barracking
he/she/it has been barracking
we have been barracking
you have been barracking
they have been barracking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been barracking
you will have been barracking
he/she/it will have been barracking
we will have been barracking
you will have been barracking
they will have been barracking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been barracking
you had been barracking
he/she/it had been barracking
we had been barracking
you had been barracking
they had been barracking
Conditional
I would barrack
you would barrack
he/she/it would barrack
we would barrack
you would barrack
they would barrack
Past Conditional
I would have barracked
you would have barracked
he/she/it would have barracked
we would have barracked
you would have barracked
they would have barracked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barrack - a building or group of buildings used to house military personnelbarrack - a building or group of buildings used to house military personnel
casern - military barracks in a garrison town
military quarters - living quarters for personnel on a military post
squad room - a room in a barracks where soldiers are billeted
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
Verb1.barrack - lodge in barracksbarrack - lodge in barracks      
lodge, accommodate - provide housing for; "We are lodging three foreign students this semester"
2.barrack - spur on or encourage especially by cheers and shoutsbarrack - spur on or encourage especially by cheers and shouts; "The crowd cheered the demonstrating strikers"
cheerlead - act as a cheerleader in a sports event
encourage - inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
3.barrack - laugh at with contempt and derisionbarrack - laugh at with contempt and derision; "The crowd jeered at the speaker"
bait, tantalise, tantalize, taunt, razz, twit, tease, cod, rag, rally, ride - harass with persistent criticism or carping; "The children teased the new teacher"; "Don't ride me so hard over my failure"; "His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie"

barrack

verb (Informal) heckle, abuse, mock, bait, criticize, boo, taunt, jeer, shout down, diss (slang, chiefly U.S.), flame (informal) Fans gained more enjoyment barracking him than cheering on the team.
Translations
kasarmi

barrack

(esp Brit) [ˈbærək] VTabuchear

barrack

[ˈbærək] vt (British) (= heckle) [+ speaker, performer] → chahuter

barrack

1
vt soldierskasernieren

barrack

2
vt actor etcauspfeifen, auszischen

barrack

[ˈbærək] vt (Brit) to barrack sbsubissare qn di grida e fischi
References in classic literature ?
Surely he must know that Kim's delivery of the letter to the officer at Umballa had caused the great war which the men and boys had discussed so loudly over the barrack dinner-tables.
The very prisoners in the guard-room were shaking the bars of their cells and howling like wild beasts, and from every barrack poured the booming as of a big war-drum.
But the thing which clean broke my heart was something which happened in front of our old barrack in a square, while we were enduring the spectacle of a man being boiled to death in oil for counterfeiting pennies.
George is becoming thoughtful, sitting before the fire in the whitewashed room, which has a sanded floor and a barrack smell and contains nothing superfluous and has not a visible speck of dirt or dust in it, from the faces of Quebec and Malta to the bright tin pots and pannikins upon the dresser shelves--Mr.
If I can reach the roof of the barracks and get my machine I can be in Sab Than's quarters in five minutes; but how am I to escape from this building, guarded as you say it is?
At no great distance were the barracks and the guard-house, where his comrades were probably telling stories of battle and bloodshed.
He roused himself to order the great bell to be rung as a signal for the plantation hands to cease work and go to their barracks.
At the back of the Infantry barracks a soldier, his cap over one eye, rushed in front of the horses and shouted that he was a dangerous highway robber.
He remembered that, not long since, when she had left Pavlofsk at his request, he had begged her to put up in town at the house of a respectable widow, who had well-furnished rooms to let, near the Ismailofsky barracks.
Niggers were two-legged lesser creatures who toiled and slaved for their two-legged white lords, who lived in the labour barracks afar off, and who were so much lesser and lower that they must not dare come near the habitation of their lords.
They were not long in reaching the barracks, for the officer who commanded the party was desirous to avoid rousing the people by the display of military force in the streets, and was humanely anxious to give as little opportunity as possible for any attempt at rescue; knowing that it must lead to bloodshed and loss of life, and that if the civil authorities by whom he was accompanied, empowered him to order his men to fire, many innocent persons would probably fall, whom curiosity or idleness had attracted to the spot.
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.