barracks


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bar·rack 1

 (băr′ək)
tr.v. bar·racked, bar·rack·ing, bar·racks
To house (soldiers, for example) in quarters.
n. often barracks
1. A building or group of buildings used to house military personnel.
2. A large, unadorned building used for temporary occupancy.

[From French baraque, hut made of planks, barrack, from Middle French barraque, ultimately (via Old Provençal baraca Old Spanish barraca) from Catalan barraca, hut, perhaps partly from a source akin to Spanish varga, thatched hut (of unknown origin) and partly from medieval Andalusian Arabic *barrāka, perhaps meaning "hut for resting beasts of burden" (from Arabic barraka, to make (a camel) kneel; akin to Akkadian birku and Hebrew berek, knee).]

bar·rack 2

 (băr′ək)
v. bar·racked, bar·rack·ing, bar·racks
v.intr.
1. Chiefly British To jeer or shout at a player, speaker, or team.
2. Australian To shout support for a team.
v.tr. Chiefly British
To shout against; jeer at.

[Perhaps from Irish dialectal barrack, to brag; akin to brag.]

bar′rack·er n.

barracks

(ˈbærəks)
pl n (sometimes singular; when plural, sometimes functions as singular)
1. (Military) a building or group of buildings used to accommodate military personnel
2. any large building used for housing people, esp temporarily
3. a large and bleak building
[C17: from French baraque, from Old Catalan barraca hut, of uncertain origin]

barracks

Block accommodation for the military since Roman times.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

barracks

plural noun camp, quarters, garrison, encampment, billet, cantonment, casern an army barracks in the north of the city
Translations
ثَكَنَةٌ عَسْكَريّه
kasárny
barakkaserne
laktanya
hermannaskáli
kareivinės
kazarmas
kasárne
vojašnica

barracks

[ˈbærəks] NPL
1. (Mil) → cuartel msing
confined to barracksarrestado en cuartel
2. (= house) → caserón m
a great barracks of a place (Brit) → una casa enorme, un caserón

barracks

[ˈbærəks] nplcaserne f

barracks

pl (often with sing vb, Mil) → Kaserne f; (fig pej also)Mietskaserne f; to live in barracksin der Kaserne wohnen
attr barracks lifeKasernenleben nt; barrack(s) squareKasernenhof m

barracks

[ˈbærəks] nplcaserma sg
confined to barracks → consegnato/a in caserma

barracks

(ˈbӕrəks) noun singular or plural
a building or buildings for housing soldiers. confined to barracks (= not allowed to leave the barracks).
References in classic literature ?
Then they marched him back in charge of a drummer-boy to empty, lime-washed barracks, whose floors were covered with rubbish and string and paper, and whose ceilings gave back his lonely footfall.
If I can reach the roof of the barracks and get my machine I can be in Sab Than's quarters in five minutes; but how am I to escape from this building, guarded as you say it is?
At no great distance were the barracks and the guard-house, where his comrades were probably telling stories of battle and bloodshed.
He roused himself to order the great bell to be rung as a signal for the plantation hands to cease work and go to their barracks.
The mutiny had broken out and the barracks of the Mavericks were one white-washed pandemonium.
At the back of the Infantry barracks a soldier, his cap over one eye, rushed in front of the horses and shouted that he was a dangerous highway robber.
He remembered that, not long since, when she had left Pavlofsk at his request, he had begged her to put up in town at the house of a respectable widow, who had well-furnished rooms to let, near the Ismailofsky barracks.
Niggers were two-legged lesser creatures who toiled and slaved for their two-legged white lords, who lived in the labour barracks afar off, and who were so much lesser and lower that they must not dare come near the habitation of their lords.
They were not long in reaching the barracks, for the officer who commanded the party was desirous to avoid rousing the people by the display of military force in the streets, and was humanely anxious to give as little opportunity as possible for any attempt at rescue; knowing that it must lead to bloodshed and loss of life, and that if the civil authorities by whom he was accompanied, empowered him to order his men to fire, many innocent persons would probably fall, whom curiosity or idleness had attracted to the spot.
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.
Stent and Ogilvy, anticipating some possibilities of a collision, had telegraphed from Horsell to the barracks as soon as the Martians emerged, for the help of a company of soldiers to protect these strange creatures from violence.
And her kind thoughts sped away as if they were angels and had wings, and flying down the river to Chatham and Rochester, strove to peep into the barracks where George was.