barren

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barren

unproductive; unfruitful; not producing results; infertile: The queen was barren.
Not to be confused with:
baron – a member of nobility; a person of great power in a particular area: an oil baron

bar·ren

 (băr′ən)
adj.
1.
a. Not producing or incapable of producing offspring. Used of female animals.
b. Often Offensive Not producing or incapable of producing offspring. Used of women.
2. Not producing or incapable of producing fruit: barren trees.
3. Lacking vegetation, especially useful vegetation: barren tundra.
4. Unproductive of results or gains; unprofitable: "That icy winter silence—how it froze you from your bride, / Tho' I made one barren effort to break it at the last!" (Alfred Lord Tennyson). See Synonyms at futile.
5. Devoid of something specified: writing barren of insight.
6. Lacking in liveliness or interest: a barren routine.
n.
often barrens A tract of unproductive land, often with a scrubby growth of trees.

[Middle English barreine, from Old French brahaigne, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

bar′ren·ly adv.
bar′ren·ness n.

barren

(ˈbærən)
adj
1. (Biology) incapable of producing offspring, seed, or fruit; sterile: a barren tree.
2. (Agriculture) unable to support the growth of crops, etc; unproductive; bare: barren land.
3. lacking in stimulation or ideas; dull: a rather barren play.
4. not producing worthwhile results; unprofitable: a barren period in a writer's life.
5. (foll by of) totally lacking (in); devoid (of): his speech was barren of wit.
6. (Palaeontology) (of rock strata) having no fossils
[C13: from Old French brahain, of uncertain origin]
ˈbarrenly adv
ˈbarrenness n

bar•ren

(ˈbær ən)

adj.
1. not producing or incapable of producing offspring; sterile.
2. unproductive; unfruitful: barren land.
3. without capacity to interest or attract: a barren period in architecture.
4. bereft; lacking (usu. fol. by of): barren of compassion.
n.
5. Usu., barrens. level or slightly rolling land, usu. with a sandy soil and few trees, and relatively infertile.
[1200–50; Middle English bareyn(e), barayn(e) < Anglo-French barai(gn)e, Old French brahaigne, appar < Celtic; compare Welsh braenar, Irish branar fallow land]
bar′ren•ly, adv.
bar′ren•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barren - an uninhabited wilderness that is worthless for cultivationbarren - an uninhabited wilderness that is worthless for cultivation; "the barrens of central Africa"; "the trackless wastes of the desert"
heathland, heath - a tract of level wasteland; uncultivated land with sandy soil and scrubby vegetation
wild, wilderness - a wild and uninhabited area left in its natural condition; "it was a wilderness preserved for the hawks and mountaineers"
Adj.1.barren - providing no shelter or sustenancebarren - providing no shelter or sustenance; "bare rocky hills"; "barren lands"; "the bleak treeless regions of the high Andes"; "the desolate surface of the moon"; "a stark landscape"
inhospitable - unfavorable to life or growth; "the barren inhospitable desert"; "inhospitable mountain areas"
2.barren - not bearing offspring; "a barren woman"; "learned early in his marriage that he was sterile"
infertile, sterile, unfertile - incapable of reproducing; "an infertile couple"
3.barren - completely wanting or lacking; "writing barren of insight"; "young recruits destitute of experience"; "innocent of literary merit"; "the sentence was devoid of meaning"
nonexistent - not having existence or being or actuality; "chimeras are nonexistent"

barren

adjective
1. desolate, empty, desert, bare, waste the Tibetan landscape of the high barren mountains
2. unproductive, dry, useless, sterile, fruitless, arid, unprofitable, unfruitful, unprolific He also wants to use water to irrigate barren desert land.
unproductive rich, useful, profitable, productive, fertile, lush, fruitful, fecund, profitable, productive
4. empty, clear, vacant, void, unfilled one loaf of bread on the otherwise barren shelves
5. (Old-fashioned) infertile, sterile, childless, unproductive, nonproductive, infecund, unprolific a three-year-old barren mare

barren

adjective
1. Unable to produce offspring:
2. Lacking or unable to produce growing plants or crops:
3. Having no useful result:
Idiom: in vain.
4. Not having a desirable element:
Idiom: in want of.
noun
A tract of unproductive land.Often used in plural:
Translations
عاقِر، قاحِل، غَيْر مُثْمِر
neplodnýneúrodný
ufrugtbar
hedelmätönkarumahosteriili
hrjóstrugur; ófrjór
bevaisisnederlingasnevaisingumas
neauglīgs

barren

[ˈbærən] ADJ [soil] → árido; [plant, woman] → estéril
barren offalto de, desprovisto de

barren

[ˈbærən] adj [period, year] → stérile; [woman, animal] → stérile; [hills, desert, mountains] → aride

barren

adj
unfruchtbar; land alsokarg
(fig) yearsunfruchtbar, unproduktiv; discussion alsofruchtlos; atmosphere alsosteril; style, subjecttrocken; topicunergiebig; the house looks barren without any furnituredas Haus wirkt ohne Möbel leer; a government barren of new ideaseine Regierung, der neue Ideen fehlen or die keinerlei neue Ideen hat
n barrens
pl (esp US) → Ödland nt

barren

[ˈbærn] adj (land) → arido/a, povero/a; (tree) → infruttuoso/a; (animal) → sterile

barren

(ˈbӕrən) adjective
not able to produce crops, fruit, young etc. barren soil; a barren fruit-tree; a barren woman.
ˈbarrenness noun

bar·ren

a. estéril, infecundo-a.
References in classic literature ?
There were two new hotels-- one a "Temperance House," whose ascetic quality was confined only to the abnegation of whiskey--a rival stage office, and a small one-storied building, from which the "Sierran Banner" fluttered weekly, for "ten dollars a year, in advance." Insufferable in the glare of a Sabbath sun, bleak, windy, and flaring in the gloom of a Sabbath night, and hopelessly depressing on all days of the week, the First Presbyterian Church lifted its blunt steeple from the barrenest area of the flats, and was hideous!
It was another thirteen-hour stretch (including an hour's "nooning.") It was over the barrenest chalk-hills and through the baldest canons that even Syria can show.
Lauck traces the idea that Puritan traditions migrated west to the literary critic Van Wyck Brooks, who wondered what Mark Twain could have become had he not hailed from the "dry, old, barren, horizonless Middle West," "the barrenest spot in all Christendom." It did not occur to Brooks that Huckleberry Finn could hardly have been written by someone born anywhere else.