barrister


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bar·ris·ter

 (băr′ĭ-stər)
n. Chiefly British
A lawyer who is authorized to appear and present cases at any court in a jurisdiction.

[Probably blend of bar and obsolete legister, legist; see legist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

barrister

(ˈbærɪstə)
n
1. (Law) Also called: barrister-at-law (in England) a lawyer who has been called to the bar and is qualified to plead in the higher courts. Compare solicitor See also advocate, counsel
2. (Law) (in Canada) a lawyer who pleads in court
3. (Law) US a less common word for lawyer
[C16: from bar1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bar•ris•ter

(ˈbær ə stər)

n.
(in England) a lawyer who is a member of one of the Inns of Court and who has the privilege of pleading in the higher courts. Compare solicitor (def. 3).
[1535–45; derivative of bar1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

barrister

A British lawyer who has been called to the bar and can plead in higher courts.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barrister - a British or Canadian lawyer who speaks in the higher courts of law on behalf of either the defense or prosecutionbarrister - a British or Canadian lawyer who speaks in the higher courts of law on behalf of either the defense or prosecution
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Counsel to the Crown - a barrister selected to serve as counsel to the British ruler
attorney, lawyer - a professional person authorized to practice law; conducts lawsuits or gives legal advice
sergeant-at-law, serjeant, serjeant-at-law, sergeant - an English barrister of the highest rank
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

barrister

noun advocate, lawyer, attorney, solicitor, counsel, Queen's Counsel, Q.C. The report has been written by a senior barrister.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

barrister

noun
Chiefly British. A person who practices law:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
advokát
advokatsagfører
málafærslumaðurmálafærslumaîur
advokāts

barrister

[ˈbærɪstəʳ] N (Brit) → abogado/a m/f LAWYERS, QC/KC
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

barrister

[ˈbærɪstər] n (British)avocat m/f (plaidant(e))
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

barrister

n (Brit) → Rechtsanwalt m/-anwältin f(bei Gericht), Barrister m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

barrister

[ˈbærɪstəʳ] n (Brit) → avvocato/essa (con diritto di parlare davanti a tutte le corti)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

barrister

(ˈbӕristə) noun
a lawyer qualified to present cases in court.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The crew was complete: it included a Boots-- A maker of Bonnets and Hoods-- A Barrister, brought to arrange their disputes-- And a Broker, to value their goods.
It grew slowly fainter, but lasted until he stood outside the barrister's chambers.
My defense --or rather my barrister's--was the simple truth.
'Yes,' said the barrister's clerk, producing his own box, and offering it with the greatest cordiality; 'and the best of it is, that as nobody alive except myself can read the serjeant's writing, they are obliged to wait for the opinions, when he has given them, till I have copied 'em, ha-ha-ha!'
Then the barrister said in a lower voice, which seemed at once sympathetic and creepy: "Did you see it distinctly?"
Briefless, the barrister's wife, who is of a good family certainly, but, as we all know, is as poor as poor can be.
Perhaps a little angry with himself, as well as with the barrister, Mr.
He was born in 1731 and became a barrister, but it seemed a profession for which he was little fitted.
Only a barrister is eligible for such preferments; and Mr.
Now, in my opinion, the barrister who put forward this extraordinary plea was probably absolutely convinced that he was stating the most liberal, the most humane, the most enlightened view of the case that could possibly be brought forward in these days.
pre-arranged for myself that I was to be the barrister I am (with the slight addition of an enormous practice, which has not accrued), and also the married man I am not.'
The barrister who has his case at his fingers' ends and is able to argue with an expert upon his own subject finds that a week or two of the courts will drive it all out of his head once more.