barristerial

barristerial

(ˌbærɪsˈtɪərɪəl)
adj
(Law) pertaining to a barrister
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Callinan's recent barristerial experience expressed itself not only in minor things such as a propensity to include long quotations from judgments, statutes and other definitive sources in his judgments, and in secondary judicial virtues such as an unwillingness to accept unnecessary, (5) obviously biased (6) or 'preposterous' (7) expert reports--but above all in the persuasiveness of his judgments.
Bouncing around behind his desk as he talks, the immediately-likeable Fletcher gives more the impression of being a man of the Chambers, with his affable barristerial manner.
(3) See, eg, Jonathon Hill, 'Litigation and Negligence: A Comparative Study' (1986) 6 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 183; David Pannick, Advocates (1992) 197-206, cited in Arthur Hall [2002] 1 AC 615, 678 (Lord Steyn); Melissa Newman, 'The Case against Advocates' Immunity: A Comparative Study' (1995) 9 Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 267; Stanley Yeo, 'Dismantling Barristerial Immunity' (1998) 14 Queensland University of Technology Law Journal 12; Peter Cane, Tort Law and Economic Interests (2nd ed, 1996) 233-8; Francis Trindade and Peter Cane, The Law of Torts in Australia (3rd ed, 1999) 429; James Goudkamp, 'Is There a Future for Advocates' Immunity?' (2002) 10 Tort Law Review 188.