barrow


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Bar·row

(băr′ō)
See Utqiagvik.

bar·row 1

 (băr′ō)
n.
1. A handbarrow.
2. A wheelbarrow.

[Middle English barowe, from Old English *bearwe; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bar·row 2

 (băr′ō)
n.
A large mound of earth or stones placed over a burial site.

[Middle English bergh, from Old English beorg, beorh, hill, burial site; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

bar·row 3

 (băr′ō)
n.
A pig that has been castrated before reaching sexual maturity.

[Middle English barow, from Old English bearg.]

barrow

(ˈbærəʊ)
n
1. (Horticulture) See wheelbarrow, handbarrow
2. Also called: barrowful the amount contained in or on a barrow
3. chiefly Brit a handcart, typically having two wheels and a canvas roof, used esp by street vendors
4. dialect Northern English concern or business (esp in the phrases that's not my barrow, that's just my barrow)
5. into one's barrow dialect Irish and Scot suited to one's interests or desires
[Old English bearwe; related to Old Norse barar bier, Old High German bāra]

barrow

(ˈbærəʊ)
n
(Archaeology) a heap of earth placed over one or more prehistoric tombs, often surrounded by ditches. Long barrows are elongated Neolithic mounds usually covering stone burial chambers; round barrows are Bronze Age, covering burials or cremations
[Old English beorg; related to Old Norse bjarg, Gothic bairgahei hill, Old High German berg mountain]

barrow

(ˈbærəʊ)
n
(Agriculture) a castrated pig
[Old English bearg; related to Old Norse börgr, Old High German barug]

Barrow

(ˈbærəʊ)
n
1. (Placename) a river in SE Ireland, rising in the Slieve Bloom Mountains and flowing south to Waterford Harbour. Length: about 193 km (120 miles)
2. (Placename) See Barrow-in-Furness, Barrow Point

bar•row1

(ˈbær oʊ)

n.
2. Brit. pushcart.
[before 1000; Middle English bar(e)we, Old English bearwe; akin to bier, bear1]

bar•row2

(ˈbær oʊ)

n.
2. a hill (used in English place names).
[before 900; Middle English berw, beruh, berg(h), Old English beorg hill, mound, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German berg mountain, Old Norse bjarg, berg cliff; akin to borough]

bar•row3

(ˈbær oʊ)

n.
a castrated male swine.
[before 1000; Middle English barowe, baru, Old English bearg, c. Old High German barug, Old Norse bǫrgr]

Bar•row

(ˈbær oʊ)

n.
1. Also called Bar′row-in-Fur′ness (ˈfɜr nɪs) a seaport in Cumbria, in NW England. 73,900.
2. Point, the N tip of Alaska: the northernmost point of the U.S.
tumulus, barrow - A tumulus is the mound of earth placed over a tomb, synonymous with barrow.
See also related terms for mound.

barrow

A large mound of earth heaped up over a prehistoric tomb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.barrow - the quantity that a barrow will holdbarrow - the quantity that a barrow will hold
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
2.barrow - (archeology) a heap of earth placed over prehistoric tombsbarrow - (archeology) a heap of earth placed over prehistoric tombs
hill, mound - structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones; "they built small mounds to hide behind"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
3.barrow - a cart for carrying small loadsbarrow - a cart for carrying small loads; has handles and one or more wheels
handcart, pushcart, cart, go-cart - wheeled vehicle that can be pushed by a person; may have one or two or four wheels; "he used a handcart to carry the rocks away"; "their pushcart was piled high with groceries"

barrow

noun cart, trolley, wheelbarrow, handcart, pushcart He tried to push four crates up a steep hill on a barrow.
Translations
رابيَه، رُكامٌ فَوْقَ قَبْرعَرَبَة عَجَلاتعَرَبَة يَد
mohylamohylový hrobtrakařdvoukolákkára
gravhøjtrækvogntrillebør
sírhalom
handkerrahjólbörur
karutispilkapisvežimėlis
divričikapkalnsķerra
bargduwkargrafheuvelgrafterpkar
mohylamohylový hrob
samokolnica
el arabasıhöyükseyyar satıcı arabasıtümülüs

barrow

1 [ˈbærəʊ]
A. N (= wheelbarrow) → carretilla f; (= market stall) → carreta f
B. CPD barrow boy N (Brit) → vendedor m callejero

barrow

2 [ˈbærəʊ] N (Archeol) → túmulo m

barrow

[ˈbærəʊ] n (= cart) → charrette f à brasbarrow-boy [ˈbærəʊbɔɪ] (British) nmarchand m des quatre saisonsbar-stool barstool [ˈbɑːrstuːl] ntabouret m de bar

barrow

1
nKarre (→ n m) f; (= wheel barrow)Schubkarre (→ n m) f; (Rail: = luggage barrow) → Gepäckkarre (→ n m) f; (esp Brit: costermonger’s) → (handgezogener) Obst-/Gemüse-/Fischkarren etc m

barrow

2
n (Archeol) → Hügelgrab nt

barrow

1 [ˈbærəʊ] n (wheelbarrow) → carriola; (market stall) → carretto, carrettino

barrow

2 [ˈbærəʊ] n (Archeol) → tumulo

barrow

(ˈbӕrəu) noun
1. a wheelbarrow.
2. a small (usually two-wheeled) cart.
3. a mound of earth piled up over the graves of important people in prehistoric times.
References in classic literature ?
There's a barrow t'other side the hedge,' said the boy.
But we heeded them not, going along wheeling the barrow by turns, and Queequeg now and then stopping to adjust the sheath on his harpoon barbs.
The man who came with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
Nobody was visible in the elevated road which skirted the ascent save the lad whom they had sent on before them, sitting on the handle of the barrow that contained all Tess's worldly possessions.
To the right of this stood, and stands to this day, an ancient barrow, or burying mound, covered deeply in a bristle of heather and bracken.
He has been excavating a barrow at Long Down and has got a prehistoric skull which fills him with great joy.
At one side was a barrowman with a load of walnuts, and beside the barrow a bedraggled woman with a black fringe and a chequered shawl thrown over her head.
A couple of porters were seated upon a barrow which contained one solitary portmanteau.
Near the castle is a barrow, said to be Hengist's tomb.
His things were put on a barrow and he followed the porter out of the station.
He slew him, but did not for very shame despoil him; when he had burned him in his wondrous armour, he raised a barrow over his ashes and the mountain nymphs, daughters of aegis-bearing Jove, planted a grove of elms about his tomb.
The barrow was got ready and the corpse placed on it, covered with a blanket, and bound to its place with the rope.