basementless

basementless

(ˈbeɪsməntlɪs)
adj
without a basement
References in periodicals archive ?
They were insistent that any publicly funded, war-related housing should be of the cheapest and most impermanent construction; by February 1943, the Cleveland Real Estate Board was expressing alarm at "basementless, concrete-floor suites of a 'permanent' type" which could "be vacated by factory workers' families after the war, creating new slums in the outlying parts of the city." This description of semi-permanent construction almost certainly referred to those war housing estates already being operated by CMHA on the city's outskirts and in some suburbs--all of which to date, it should be emphasized, were programmed strictly for white occupancy (recall Figure 1).
The concentration of radon in a building depends on the size and depth of the basement (although basementless homes in some areas can still have high levels); wall construction (cinder-block walls are more porous than concrete, allowing more seepage); floor integrity (a cracked floor slab invites radon in); and ventilation (more air-flow in basements and crawl spaces means less accumulation).