baseness


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Related to baseness: basifier

base 1

 (bās)
n.
1. The lowest or bottom part: the base of a cliff; the base of a lamp.
2. Biology
a. The part of a plant or animal organ that is nearest to its point of attachment.
b. The point of attachment of such an organ.
3.
a. A supporting part or layer; a foundation: a skyscraper built on a base of solid rock.
b. A basic or underlying element; infrastructure: the nation's industrial base.
4. The fundamental principle or underlying concept of a system or theory; a basis.
5. A fundamental ingredient; a chief constituent: a paint with an oil base.
6. The fact, observation, or premise from which a reasoning process is begun.
7.
a. Games A starting point, safety area, or goal.
b. Baseball Any one of the four corners of an infield, marked by a bag or plate, that must be touched by a runner before a run can be scored.
8.
a. A center of organization, supply, or activity; a headquarters.
b. The portion of a social organization, especially a political party, consisting of the most dedicated or motivated members.
9.
a. A fortified center of operations.
b. A supply center for a large force of military personnel.
10. A facial cosmetic used to even out the complexion or provide a surface for other makeup; a foundation.
11. Architecture The lowest part of a structure, such as a wall, considered as a separate unit: the base of a column.
12. Heraldry The lower part of a shield.
13. Linguistics A morpheme or morphemes regarded as a form to which affixes or other bases may be added.
14. Mathematics
a. The side or face of a geometric figure to which an altitude is or is thought to be drawn.
b. The number that is raised to various powers to generate the principal counting units of a number system. The base of the decimal system, for example, is 10.
c. The number raised to the logarithm of a designated number in order to produce that designated number; the number at which a chosen logarithmic scale has the value 1.
15. A line used as a reference for measurement or computations.
16. Chemistry
a. Any of a class of compounds whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a bitter taste, a slippery feel, the ability to turn litmus blue, and the ability to react with acids to form salts.
b. A substance that yields hydroxide ions when dissolved in water.
c. A substance that can act as a proton acceptor.
d. A substance that can donate a pair of electrons to form a covalent bond.
17. Electronics
a. The region in a transistor between the emitter and the collector.
b. The electrode attached to this region.
18. One of the nitrogen-containing purines (adenine and guanine) or pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, and uracil) that occurs attached to the sugar component of DNA or RNA.
adj.
1. Forming or serving as a base: a base layer of soil.
2. Situated at or near the base or bottom: a base camp for the mountain climbers.
3. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing a base.
tr.v. based, bas·ing, bas·es
1. To form or provide a base for: based the new company in Portland.
2. To find a basis for; establish: based her conclusions on the report; a film based on a best-selling novel.
3. To assign to a base; station: troops based in the Middle East.
Idiom:
off base
Badly mistaken.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin basis, from Greek; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: base1, basis, foundation, ground1, groundwork
These nouns all pertain to what underlies and supports. Base is used broadly in both literal and figurative contexts: the wide base of the pyramid; a party seeking to expand its power base.
Basis is used in a nonphysical sense: "Healthy scepticism is the basis of all accurate observation" (Arthur Conan Doyle).
Foundation often stresses firmness of support for something of relative magnitude: "Our flagrant disregard for the law attacks the foundation of this society" (Peter D. Relic).
Ground is used figuratively, especially in the plural, to mean a justifiable reason: grounds for divorce.
Groundwork usually has the sense of a necessary preliminary: "It [the Universal Declaration of Human Rights] has laid the groundwork for the world's war crimes tribunals" (Hillary Rodham Clinton).

base 2

 (bās)
adj. bas·er, bas·est
1. Having or showing a lack of decency; contemptible, mean-spirited, or selfish.
2.
a. Being a metal that is of little value.
b. Containing such metals: base coins.
3. Archaic Of low birth, rank, or position.
4. Obsolete Short in stature.
n. Obsolete
A bass singer or voice.

[Middle English bas, low, from Old French, from Medieval Latin bassus.]

base′ly adv.
base′ness n.
Synonyms: base2, low1, abject, ignoble, mean2, sordid
These adjectives mean lacking in dignity or falling short of the standards befitting humans. Base suggests a contemptible, mean-spirited, or selfish lack of human decency: "that liberal obedience, without which your army would be a base rabble" (Edmund Burke).
Something low violates standards of morality, ethics, or propriety: low cunning; a low trick. Abject means degrading or miserable: abject failure; abject poverty. Ignoble means lacking noble qualities, such as elevated moral character: "For my part I think it a less evil that some criminals should escape than that the government should play an ignoble part" (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.).
Mean suggests pettiness, spite, or stinginess: "Never ascribe to an opponent motives meaner than your own" (J.M. Barrie).
Sordid suggests foul, repulsive degradation: "It is through art ... that we can shield ourselves from the sordid perils of actual existence" (Oscar Wilde).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baseness - unworthiness by virtue of lacking higher valuesbaseness - unworthiness by virtue of lacking higher values
unworthiness - the quality or state of lacking merit or value
Translations
دَناءَه، حَقارَه
nízkostpodlostsprostota
simpelhed
ódrengskapur
nízkosť
adîlikalçaklıkrezillik

baseness

[ˈbeɪsnɪs] Nbajeza f, vileza f

baseness

n
(of motive, character)Niedrigkeit f; (of person, thoughts, action, lie, slander)Gemeinheit f, → Niederträchtigkeit f
(of task)Niedrigkeit f; (of coin)Falschheit f
(obs: of birth) (= humbleness)Niedrigkeit f (old); (= illegitimacy)Unehelichkeit f

baseness

[ˈbeɪsnɪs] n (liter) (of action, behaviour) → bassezza (morale)

base2

(beis) adjective
wicked or worthless. base desires.
ˈbasely adverb
ˈbaseness noun
References in classic literature ?
And yet boldness is a child of ignorance and baseness, far inferior to other parts.
And that prince who, relying entirely on their promises, has neglected other precautions, is ruined; because friendships that are obtained by payments, and not by greatness or nobility of mind, may indeed be earned, but they are not secured, and in time of need cannot be relied upon; and men have less scruple in offending one who is beloved than one who is feared, for love is preserved by the link of obligation which, owing to the baseness of men, is broken at every opportunity for their advantage; but fear preserves you by a dread of punishment which never fails.
Mr Allworthy himself spoke to the captain in his brother's behalf, and desired to know what offence the doctor had committed; when the hard-hearted villain had the baseness to say that he should never forgive him for the injury which he had endeavoured to do him in his favour; which, he said, he had pumped out of him, and was such a cruelty that it ought not to be forgiven.
In thy presence they feel themselves small, and their baseness gleameth and gloweth against thee in invisible vengeance.
I know all the baseness, all the horror of my position; but it's not so easy to arrange as you think.
Erskine is a poor man, and in his comfortable poverty--save the mark--lies your salvation from the baseness of marrying for wealth and position; a baseness of which women of your class stand in constant peril.
The baseness of confirming him in this suspicion or pretence of one (for he could not have really entertained it), was a line's breadth beyond the mark the schoolmaster had reached.
Through her blue eyes and long blonde hair, she is seen as the new hero, bravely fighting Israeli baseness and armoury.
But America will never fully recover from the unstanchable wound that his presidency's baseness, bull-headed stupidity and puzzling passivity in the face of China's global ambitions has inflicted on its culture and international standing.
There has been no limit to the depth of their baseness, chicanery, deceit and degradation.
The report wraps up with a reference to the degree of baseness and degradation that media outlets owned by the blockading countries have reached.
On paper it's a hideous display of lowest common denominator baseness that sees couples humping their way to PS50,000.