baserunner

baserunner

(ˈbeɪsˌrʌnə)
n
(Baseball) a baseball player in the act of running around bases
References in periodicals archive ?
They combined with Heath Renz and Jake Godfrey (2-1) to allow the Wild Things just one baserunner over the final four innings of the game, as Southern Illinois secured the series victory by winning the first two games.
The typical explanation of its purpose focuses on the baserunner's dilemma.
When it comes to stealing bases these days, no one is feared more than Cincinnati center fielder Billy Hamilton, generally recognized as the fastest baserunner in the game.
Their only baserunner over that span was Kwang-Min Kwon, who walked with one out in the sixth.
The new COMMANDO Select Mortar Vehicle and COMMANDO Utility Baserunner are being shown in Booth 03-B30 during IDEX 2013.
Only an average hitter, but a speedy and aggressive baserunner, Sunday would probably have batted first or second on that team; when batting second, SUNDAY would likely have been followed to the plate at times by MONDAY, a lifetime .264 hitter and two-time All-Star.
For example, many baseball fans love to use the sacrifice bunt to move a baserunner from first to second base--a strategy known as small ball--but giving up an out to do so.
The error by Izturis was as much a mental mistake as a physical one, since he had a much easier play to register an out at first base and the only baserunner that mattered was Hairston, who was already ensured third base.
Being a smart baserunner is the first step that will lead to many more, all the way around the bases and into home.
If such technologies are available to everyone and if the health risks are low--or lower, at least, then getting pulverized by a bulky baserunner sprinting toward home plate--then why single out steroids?
Trouble is, there only are two out and an Astro baserunner scampers home with an insurance run as the ball rolls across toward the vacated pitcher's mound.
Cartwright fixed four as the number of bases, not two, three, or five; set them 90 feet apart; stood the batter in a box at home plate, not at some distance from it; made the bases flat; and ruled out "plugging" a baserunner with a thrown ball to put him out.