basilar membrane


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Related to basilar membrane: organ of Corti

basilar membrane

n.
The membrane that extends from the margin of the bony shelf of the cochlea to its outer wall and on which the sensory cells of the organ of Corti rest.

basilar membrane

A structure of the inner ear.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basilar membrane - a membrane in the cochlea that supports the organ of Cortibasilar membrane - a membrane in the cochlea that supports the organ of Corti
cochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corti
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
References in periodicals archive ?
The low frequency sound signals cause the basilar membrane to vibrate with highest oscillation occurring at the apex of the cochlea.
Some noted thickened capillaries in the stria vascularis, basilar membrane, and endolymphatic sac [5].
Their basilar membranes are wider, thinner, and floppier than those of other mammals, which makes them sensitive to low frequencies.
10) The cochlear hair cells detect displacement of the basilar membrane and are the weakest link in the transduction of sound energy through the cochlea.
High frequency tones excite the basilar membrane on its basal end and low frequency tones excite the basilar membrane on its apical end.
On the other hand, if the place theory is of great importance in coding frequency, would it matter whether the electrical stimulus caused excitation of nerve fibers at the same rate as an auditory stimulus, or could the nerve fibers passing to a particular portion of the basilar membrane be stimulated without their need to fire in phase with the stimulus?
One reason for this is that the basilar membrane in the cochlea loses some of its elasticity which adversely affects hearing.
One recently developed model of the cochlea, a spiral-shaped, fluid-filled organ in the inner ear, illuminates how sound waves of different frequencies excite fibers in the basilar membrane, a platform running down the cochlea.
The sense cells which transform the mechanical signals into the electrical signals are located just on the basilar membrane.