basilicon


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Related to basilicon: basilican, Basilikon Doron

basilicon

(bəˈsɪlɪˌkɒn)
n
any of a variety of healing ointments applied to wounds in early medicine, commonly using lard or oil, resin, and wax
References in periodicals archive ?
Para llegar a su definicion utilizo como estrategia la tesis de que la diferencia entre un monarca ([Phrase omitted], basilicon), un estadista ([Phrase omitted], politicon), un amo de esclavos ([Phrase omitted], despoticon) y el dueno de una casa o hacienda ([Phrase omitted], oiconomicon) no era sino cuantitativa: una misma persona que hubiese desempenado estos cuatro oficios a lo largo de su vida habria hecho siempre exactamente lo mismo y la unica diferencia en cada caso habria sido el numero de personas que tenia bajo su gobierno (50).
Sentence (24), however, illustrates the predictive function of will in King James VFs mirror for princes, the Basilicon Doron, a non-religious educational text.
Shandy's 'lint and basilicon': The importance of women in Tristram Shandy".
His most important prose work, the Basilicon Doron (1599), was 'successfully "Englished" over the several editions that followed his initial manuscript edition in Scots, but the king's prose and speech remained "everywhere thickly strewn .
(9) Chambers observes: "In general design the sheet is not unlike the page of woodcut emblems in Peacham's Minerva Britanna (1612) or the coloured illustrations to King James's Basilicon Doron ...
(119.) KING JAMES I, Basilicon Doron, in KING JAMES VI AND I:
Such is the nature of royalty presented by King James I in Basilicon Doron.
See James I., Basilicon Doron (Menston,Yorkshire: The Scolar Press Limited, 1969), 28, where James describes the difference between usurping tyrants and lawful kings.
In addition to a reprinting of Basilicon Doron in 1603, James's Lepanto also received a new edition in London that year, which must have pleased the new English king.
in mind when he wrote Basilicon Doron shortly afterwards, and painted a
Michael Ullyot continues this theme by examining James' instructions to his son, in his Basilicon Doron.
(2) Ruth Perry, in "Words for Sex: The Verbal-Sexual Continuum in Tristram Shandy," argues that Sterne's novel is phallocentric, whilst the opposite case is argued by, for instance Leigh Ehlers, "Mrs Shandy's 'Lint and Basilicon': The Importance of Women in Tristram Shandy"; Juliet McMaster, "Walter Shandy, Sterne, and Gender: a Feminist Foray"; Helen Ostovich, "Reader as Hobby-Horse in Tristram Shandy"; Paula Loscocco, "'Can't Live without 'em': Walter Shandy and the Woman Within"; Melvyn New, "Job's Wife and Sterne's Other Women."