basking shark


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bask·ing shark

(băs′kĭng)
n.
A very large shark (Cetorhinus maximus) that measures up to about 12 meters (40 feet) in length, feeds on plankton, and often floats near the surface of the water.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

basking shark

n
(Animals) a very large plankton-eating shark, Cetorhinus maximus, often floating at the sea surface: family Cetorhinidae. Also called: sailfish
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bask′ing shark`

(ˈbæs kɪŋ, ˈbɑ skɪŋ)
n.
a large shark, Cetorhinus maximus, of cold and temperate seas, that often swims slowly or floats at the surface.
[1760–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basking shark - large harmless plankton-eating northern sharkbasking shark - large harmless plankton-eating northern shark; often swims slowly or floats at the sea surface
mackerel shark - fierce pelagic and oceanic sharks
Cetorhinus, genus Cetorhinus - comprising only the basking sharks; in some classifications considered the type genus of a separate family Cetorhinidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
requin pèlerin

basking shark

nRiesenhai m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

basking shark

[ˈbɑːskɪŋˈʃɑːk] nsqualo elefante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He met with more adventures than can be told, and narrowly escaped being caught by the Basking Shark, and the Spotted Shark, and the Hammerhead, and he met all the untrustworthy ruffians that loaf up and down the seas, and the heavy polite fish, and the scarlet spotted scallops that are moored in one place for hundreds of years, and grow very proud of it; but he never met Sea Cow, and he never found an island that he could fancy.
It's vital that any fishermen, sailors or divers who see a basking shark report their sighting to us.
Naomi Crowder ticked off two of her bucket list feats on an adventure week with Oban boat tour firm Basking Shark Scotland.
CLOSER LOOK: A basking shark, the world's second-largest fish, feeding on plankton around St Michael's Mount, Cornwall
Charlene's catch came as a 23ft basking shark was spotted off Achill Island, Co Kerry, this month.
Such incidents are a major breakthrough for scientists who are mapping the world's second largest fish, the basking shark.
A BASKING shark has been spotted swimming close to the shore in New Quay Bay, Ceredigion.
It is thought to be a basking shark, one of the largest sharks anywhere in the world.
Just last week, fisherman Tony Marron filmed an 18ft basking shark just a mile away from the Tyne - a rare sight according to experts.
I'm not sure how much of a market there is for this history of the world's second-largest fish, the basking shark (it's an esoteric subject), but Speedie's dedication to his subject and engaging prose deserve an audience.