bass viol

(redirected from bass viols)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bass viol

 (bās)

bass viol

(beɪs)
n
1. (Instruments) another name for viola da gamba
2. (Instruments) US a less common name for double bass1

vi•o•la da gam•ba

(viˈoʊ lə də ˈgɑm bə, ˈgæm-)

n., pl. viola da gam•bas.
an old instrument of the viol family, held on or between the knees; bass viol.
[1590–1600; < Italian: literally, viol for the leg]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bass viol - viol that is the bass member of the viol family with approximately the range of the cellobass viol - viol that is the bass member of the viol family with approximately the range of the cello
viol - any of a family of bowed stringed instruments that preceded the violin family
2.bass viol - largest and lowest member of the violin familybass viol - largest and lowest member of the violin family
bass - the member with the lowest range of a family of musical instruments
bowed stringed instrument, string - stringed instruments that are played with a bow; "the strings played superlatively well"
Translations

bass viol

nGambe f
References in classic literature ?
Lifting his hand to his head, the absent-minded Professor gravely felt and removed the little cocked hat, looked at it a minute, and then threw back his head and laughed like a merry bass viol.
We got rid of all gloom in the excitement of the exercise, and our pleasure was increased by the arrival of the Gimmerton band, mustering fifteen strong: a trumpet, a trombone, clarionets, bassoons, French horns, and a bass viol, besides singers.
Why, yes," said Robert Danforth, his strong voice filling the shop as with the sound of a bass viol, "I consider myself equal to anything in the way of my own trade; though I should have made but a poor figure at yours with such a fist as this," added he, laughing, as he laid his vast hand beside the delicate one of Owen.
Two appendices to the new Hingeston volume supply a reconstruction of two suites for treble viol, tenor and bass viols, and organ.
Indeed, discussing the movie in National Review, John Simon writes, "I know of no sounds less bearable than those of baroque music, unless it be baroque music played on one, two, or three bass viols, than which I can think of nothing more base and vile" (54).
The first of three concerts is this weekend when Roger Deats and Jacqui Robertson will play treble and bass viols in music by Dowland, Coprario and Gibbons.
In total contrast is Simpson's boisterous Divisions in G for two bass viols which is performed with suitable panache until the calming arrival of peals of bells heralds its conclusion.
The same concerto employs what are typical ripieno instruments, violas, in a solo capacity, while the bass viols, normally associated with virtuoso performance, are reduced to inner-part status for much of the time.
The sonatas for two bass viols with optional continuo present players with greater difficulties but also greater rewards.
Thurston Dart's argument that Purcell intended his fantazias for a mixed consort of violins and viols may have been influenced by the shortage of dexterous treble players in the 1960s: and for many years London Baroque's accomplished recording of 1984 (EMI CDM7 63066 2), using two violins alongside tenor and bass viols, has been the best available.
9 and 10, in which the two bass viols are given elaborate divisions.
Therefore, these four-part suites, and especially the almands, join a repertory of airs composed by Jenkins, Lawes, and Locke wherein the parts frequently utilize a kind of division technique that allows for rapid flashes of technical display and an especially wide range for the two bass viols.