basswood

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bass·wood

 (băs′wo͝od′)
n.
1. See linden.
2. The soft, light-colored wood of any species of linden. It is used in making crates and boxes, in carving, and in millwork.

[bass, linden bark (alteration of bast) + wood.]

basswood

(ˈbæsˌwʊd)
n
1. (Plants) any of several North American linden trees, esp Tilia americana
2. (Plants) the soft light-coloured wood of any of these trees, used for furniture
[C19: from bass3; see bast]

bass•wood

(ˈbæsˌwʊd)

n.
1. any of several New World linden trees.
2. the wood of such a tree.
[1660–70, Amer.; bass3 + wood1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basswood - soft light-colored wood of any of various linden treesbasswood - soft light-colored wood of any of various linden trees; used in making crates and boxes and in carving and millwork
linden tree, basswood, lime tree, linden, lime - any of various deciduous trees of the genus Tilia with heart-shaped leaves and drooping cymose clusters of yellowish often fragrant flowers; several yield valuable timber
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.basswood - any of various deciduous trees of the genus Tilia with heart-shaped leaves and drooping cymose clusters of yellowish often fragrant flowersbasswood - any of various deciduous trees of the genus Tilia with heart-shaped leaves and drooping cymose clusters of yellowish often fragrant flowers; several yield valuable timber
genus Tilia, Tilia - deciduous trees with smooth usually silver-grey bark of North America and Europe and Asia: lime trees; lindens; basswood
basswood, linden - soft light-colored wood of any of various linden trees; used in making crates and boxes and in carving and millwork
American basswood, American lime, Tilia americana - large American shade tree with large dark green leaves and rounded crown
small-leaved lime, small-leaved linden, Tilia cordata - large spreading European linden with small dark green leaves; often cultivated as an ornamental
Tilia heterophylla, white basswood, cottonwood - American basswood of the Allegheny region
Japanese lime, Japanese linden, Tilia japonica - medium-sized tree of Japan used as an ornamental
silver lime, silver linden, Tilia tomentosa - large tree native to eastern Europe and Asia Minor having leaves with white tomentum on the under side; widely cultivated as an ornamental
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Neither shall we dwell upon the changes of climate and productions, as the voyagers swept down from north to south, across several degrees of latitude; arriving at the regions of oaks and sycamores; of mulberry and basswood trees; of paroquets and wild turkeys.
A deep and careless incision had been made into each tree, near its root, into which little spouts, formed of the I bark of the alder, or of the sumach, were fastened; and a trough, roughly dug out of the linden, or basswood, was I lying at the root of each tree, to catch the sap that flowed from this extremely wasteful and inartificial arrangement.
As a result, he has eight to 10 species of basswoods (Tilia spp), probably one of the finest collections in Michigan.
The intruder was just a scrawny little forkhorn, lying passively with his back against a clump of basswoods.
Many species of Tilia here and in Europe have long been planted for landscape trees -- basswoods and lime trees are also called boulevard trees and are used for decorative purposes, although there is a downside to their use.
Towering maples and basswoods arch overhead, forming a natural cathedral.
Relatively speaking, England's limes and the basswoods of America are considered excellent boulevard or decorative trees, described by author Hugh Johnson in "The Encyclopedia of Trees," as "rearing twiggy monsters.
As the tree density increases because of fire suppression--from 10 to 40 oaks per acre in savanna to 200 or more oaks, maples, and basswoods per acre in the protected woods--hardly any light reaches the soil.
But, she explains, where the conditions for forest development are optimum--the rain abundant, the weather warm--the forest is characterized by a mix of dominant trees: tuliptrees, beech, white oak, black oak, four different basswoods, sugar maple, buckeye, hemlock, among others.