baste

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baste 1

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
To sew loosely with large running stitches so as to hold together temporarily.

[Middle English basten, from Old French bastir, of Germanic origin.]

bast′er n.

baste 2

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
To moisten (meat, for example) periodically with a liquid, such as melted butter or a sauce, especially while cooking.

[Middle English basten.]

bast′er n.

baste 3

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
1. To beat vigorously; thrash: basted the attacker with a club.
2. To scold; berate.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse beysta; see bhau- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(Knitting & Sewing) (tr) to sew with loose temporary stitches
[C14: from Old French bastir to build, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German besten to sew with bast]

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(Cookery) to moisten (meat) during cooking with hot fat and the juices produced
[C15: of uncertain origin]

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(tr) to beat thoroughly; thrash
[C16: probably from Old Norse beysta]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

baste1

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
to sew with long, loose stitches, as in temporarily joining parts of a garment while it is being made.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French bastir to build, baste < Germanic; compare Old High German bestan to mend, patch, for *bastian, derivative of bast bast]
bast′er, n.

baste2

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
to moisten (meat or other food) with drippings, butter, etc., while cooking.
[1425–75]
bast′er, n.

baste3

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
1. to beat with a stick; thrash; cudgel.
2. to denounce or scold vigorously.
[1525–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

baste


Past participle: basted
Gerund: basting

Imperative
baste
baste
Present
I baste
you baste
he/she/it bastes
we baste
you baste
they baste
Preterite
I basted
you basted
he/she/it basted
we basted
you basted
they basted
Present Continuous
I am basting
you are basting
he/she/it is basting
we are basting
you are basting
they are basting
Present Perfect
I have basted
you have basted
he/she/it has basted
we have basted
you have basted
they have basted
Past Continuous
I was basting
you were basting
he/she/it was basting
we were basting
you were basting
they were basting
Past Perfect
I had basted
you had basted
he/she/it had basted
we had basted
you had basted
they had basted
Future
I will baste
you will baste
he/she/it will baste
we will baste
you will baste
they will baste
Future Perfect
I will have basted
you will have basted
he/she/it will have basted
we will have basted
you will have basted
they will have basted
Future Continuous
I will be basting
you will be basting
he/she/it will be basting
we will be basting
you will be basting
they will be basting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been basting
you have been basting
he/she/it has been basting
we have been basting
you have been basting
they have been basting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been basting
you will have been basting
he/she/it will have been basting
we will have been basting
you will have been basting
they will have been basting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been basting
you had been basting
he/she/it had been basting
we had been basting
you had been basting
they had been basting
Conditional
I would baste
you would baste
he/she/it would baste
we would baste
you would baste
they would baste
Past Conditional
I would have basted
you would have basted
he/she/it would have basted
we would have basted
you would have basted
they would have basted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

baste


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To moisten food with the fatty liquid in which it is cooking.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baste - a loose temporary sewing stitch to hold layers of fabric togetherbaste - a loose temporary sewing stitch to hold layers of fabric together
embroidery stitch, sewing stitch - a stitch made with thread and a threaded sewing needle through fabric or leather
Verb1.baste - cover with liquid before cookingbaste - cover with liquid before cooking; "baste a roast"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
moisten, dampen, wash - make moist; "The dew moistened the meadows"
2.baste - strike violently and repeatedlybaste - strike violently and repeatedly; "She clobbered the man who tried to attack her"
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
3.baste - sew together loosely, with large stitchesbaste - sew together loosely, with large stitches; "baste a hem"
sew, sew together, stitch, run up - fasten by sewing; do needlework
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

baste

verb
To hit heavily and repeatedly with violent blows:
Informal: lambaste.
Slang: clobber.
Idiom: rain blows on.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

baste

[beɪst] VT
1. (Culin) → pringar
2. (Sew) → hilvanar
3. (= beat) → dar una paliza a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

baste

[ˈbeɪst] vt
[+ meat] → arroser
(= tack) → bâtir, faufiler
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

baste

1
vt (Sew) → heften

baste

2
vt (Cook) → (mit Fett) beträufeln or begießen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

baste

[beɪst] vt (Culin) → ungere, inumidire col suo sugo (Sewing) → imbastire
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A short time after she pursued--"I seed you go out with the master, but I didn't know you were gone to church to be wed;" and she basted away.
Then she went and put the fowls down again to the fire, basted them, and drove the spit merrily round.
I said when she came out of the carriage, "YOU'll do, my dear!" and I ran straight home and cut her out and basted her.
The pay was eighty-five rupees a month, and Dinah Shadd said that if Terence did not accept she would make his life a "basted purgathory." Therefore the Mulvaneys came out as "civilians," which was a great and terrible fall; though Mulvaney tried to disguise it by saying that he was "Ker'nel on the railway line, an' a consequinshal man."
They girdled the mountains and basted the prairies with wire, until the lonely places were brought together and made sociable.