bastille


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bas·tille

 (bă-stēl′)
n.
A prison; a jail.

[French, from Old French, fortress, alteration of bastide, from Old Provençal bastida, from bastir, to build, of Germanic origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bastille

(bæˈstiːl; French bastij)
n
(Placename) a fortress in Paris, built in the 14th century: a prison until its destruction in 1789, at the beginning of the French Revolution
[C14: from Old French bastile fortress, from Old Provençal bastida, from bastir to build, of Germanic origin; see baste1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bas•tille

or bas•tile

(bæˈstil)

n.
1. (cap.) a fortress in Paris, used as a prison, captured by revolutionaries on July 14, 1789.
2. any prison or jail.
[1350–1400; Middle English bastile < Middle French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bastille

A royal prison in Paris used exclusively for state prisoners.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bastille - a fortress built in Paris in the 14th century and used as a prison in the 17th and 18th centuriesBastille - a fortress built in Paris in the 14th century and used as a prison in the 17th and 18th centuries; it was destroyed July 14, 1789 at the start of the French Revolution
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
capital of France, City of Light, French capital, Paris - the capital and largest city of France; and international center of culture and commerce
2.Bastille - a jail or prison (especially one that is run in a tyrannical manner)bastille - a jail or prison (especially one that is run in a tyrannical manner)
gaol, jail, jailhouse, pokey, poky, slammer, clink - a correctional institution used to detain persons who are in the lawful custody of the government (either accused persons awaiting trial or convicted persons serving a sentence)
prison, prison house - a correctional institution where persons are confined while on trial or for punishment
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
I am not a fighting man at all, monsieur, and I am afraid of the Bastille."
"I have no greater regard for the Bastille than you.
It is a turning out of the Rue Saint- Antoine, beginning just opposite a fountain near the Place de la Bastille, and ending in the Rue de la Cerisaie.
I allowed him to lead, and he went in the direction of the Fosses de la Bastille, as if he could see; walking till he reached a lonely spot down by the river, just where the bridge has since been built at the junction of the Canal Saint-Martin and the Seine.
For me his confidences reached the proportions of tragedy; at the sight of that white head of his and beyond it the black water in the trenches of the Bastille lying still as a canal in Venice, I had no words to answer him.
While one external cause, and that a reference to his long lingering agony, would always--as on the trial--evoke this condition from the depths of his soul, it was also in its nature to arise of itself, and to draw a gloom over him, as incomprehensible to those unacquainted with his story as if they had seen the shadow of the actual Bastille thrown upon him by a summer sun, when the substance was three hundred miles away.
To the right of the Tournelles, that truss of enormous towers, black as ink, running into each other and tied, as it were, by a circular moat; that donjon keep, much more pierced with loopholes than with windows; that drawbridge, always raised; that portcullis, always lowered,--is the Bastille. Those sorts of black beaks which project from between the battlements, and which you take from a distance to be cave spouts, are cannons.
Behind the Bastille there were twenty hovels clustered round the curious sculptures of the Croix-Faubin and the flying buttresses of the Abbey of Saint- Antoine des Champs; then Popincourt, lost amid wheat fields; then la Courtille, a merry village of wine-shops; the hamlet of Saint-Laurent with its church whose bell tower, from afar, seemed to add itself to the pointed towers of the Porte Saint- Martin; the Faubourg Saint-Denis, with the vast enclosure of Saint-Ladre; beyond the Montmartre Gate, the Grange- Batelière, encircled with white walls; behind it, with its chalky slopes, Montmartre, which had then almost as many churches as windmills, and which has kept only the windmills, for society no longer demands anything but bread for the body.
Yonder is the Abbey of Saint-Martin, a shrill, cracked singer; here the gruff and gloomy voice of the Bastille; at the other end, the great tower of the Louvre, with its bass.
It was like meeting an old friend when we read Rue de Rivoli on the street corner; we knew the genuine vast palace of the Louvre as well as we knew its picture; when we passed by the Column of July we needed no one to tell us what it was or to remind us that on its site once stood the grim Bastille, that grave of human hopes and happiness, that dismal prison house within whose dungeons so many young faces put on the wrinkles of age, so many proud spirits grew humble, so many brave hearts broke.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Riot police and anti-government protesters faced off during Bastille Day celebrations in Paris, while dozens of people were arrested, with calls for President Emmanuel Macron to resign again being chanted out loud.
MOVIE buff musicians Bastille are working on a secret cinematic project.