rabies

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ra·bies

 (rā′bēz)
n.
An acute, infectious, usually fatal viral disease of the central nervous system that is transmitted by the bite of infected animals and occurs in many mammals, including dogs, cats, raccoons, and bats.

[Latin rabiēs, rage, from rabere, to rave.]

ra′bi·et′ic (-ĕt′ĭk) adj.

rabies

(ˈreɪbiːz)
n
(Veterinary Science) pathol an acute infectious viral disease of the nervous system transmitted by the saliva of infected animals, esp dogs. It is characterized by excessive salivation, aversion to water, convulsions, and paralysis. Also called: hydrophobia or lyssa
[C17: from Latin: madness, from rabere to rave]
rabic, rabietic adj

ra•bies

(ˈreɪ biz)

n.
an infectious, usu. fatal disease of dogs, cats, and other warm-blooded animals, caused by a rhabdovirus and transmitted to humans by the bite of a rabid animal.
[1655–65; < Latin rabiēs ferocity, frenzy, rabies, akin to rabere to be mad, rave]

ra·bies

(rā′bēz)
A usually fatal viral disease of warm-blooded animals that causes inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. It is transmitted by the bite of an infected animal and can be prevented in humans by a vaccine. See Note at hydrophobia.
rabid, rabies - Rabid and rabies come from Latin rabere, "be mad."
See also related terms for mad.

Rabies


rabies in human beings. Also called lyssa.
an abnormal fear of rabies. See also hydrophobophobia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rabies - an acute viral disease of the nervous system of warm-blooded animals (usually transmitted by the bite of a rabid animal)rabies - an acute viral disease of the nervous system of warm-blooded animals (usually transmitted by the bite of a rabid animal); rabies is fatal if the virus reaches the brain
zoonosis, zoonotic disease - an animal disease that can be transmitted to humans
Translations
دَاءُ الكَلْبداء الكَلَب
vzteklina
rabieshundegalskab
vesikauhu
bjesnoća
veszettség
hundaæîi
狂犬病
공수병
pasiutligė
trakumsērga
besnota
rabies
โรคพิษสุนัขบ้า
bệnh dại

rabies

[ˈreɪbiːz] NSINGrabia f
a dog with rabiesun perro rabioso

rabies

[ˈreɪbiːz]
nrage f
a dog with rabies → un chien enragé
modif [injection] → antirabique; [virus] → de la rage

rabies

nTollwut f

rabies

[ˈreɪbiːz] nrabbia, idrofobia

rabies

(ˈreibiːz) noun
a disease that causes madness (and usually death) in dogs and other animals (including humans).

rabies

دَاءُ الكَلْب vzteklina rabies Tollwut λύσσα rabia vesikauhu rage bjesnoća rabbia 狂犬病 공수병 hondsdolheid rabies wścieklizna raiva бешенство rabies โรคพิษสุนัขบ้า kuduz bệnh dại 狂犬病

ra·bies

n. rabia. V.: hydrophobia

rabies

n rabia
References in periodicals archive ?
In areas where both raccoon and bat rabies occur, human rabies exposures are 600% higher than in areas where only bat rabies occurs (1,9).
PHE warned the bat rabies virus "is related to the classical rabies virus and can lead to clinical rabies in humans".
Rupprecht, "Rates of viral evolution are linked to host geography in bat rabies," PLoS Pathogens, vol.
In Latin American countries where bat rabies is a threat, bovine vaccines have been used, as have anticoagulants, to kill bats that feed off the blood of the treated cattle.
Trends in national surveillance data for bat rabies in the United States: 2001-2009.
Because bat rabies is more difficult to control than dog rabies, and some developing countries still have difficulties controlling rabies, eradication of rabies is not a realistic objective.
There are several strains of rabies found in the United States, including skunk and raccoon, but only bat rabies is found in Oregon.
The early history of the occurrence of bat rabies in the United States has been summarized (Sulkind and Greve, 1954; Venters et al., 1954; Baer and Adams, 1970; Constantine, 1979).
The topics include the rabies virus, molecular epidemiology, bat rabies, human disease, pathogenesis, immunology, the next generation of rabies vaccines, the public health management of humans at risk, dog rabies and its control, rabies control in wild carnivore, and a blueprint for rabies prevention and control.
Molecular epidemiological analysis of bat rabies viruses in Brazil.
Bat Rabies, Public Health and European Bat Conservation.