batata


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ba·ta·ta

 (bə-tä′tə)
n.
A type of sweet potato having somewhat dry, bland, yellowish to white flesh, used as a staple food in many tropical countries. Also called boniato, camote.

[American Spanish, perhaps of Taíno origin.]

batata

(bəˈtɑːtə)
n
(Cookery) another name for sweet potato
[C16: from Spanish, from Taino]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
His musical repertoire includes popular hits such as "Hona al-Qahera" (Here is Cairo), "A'm Batata" (Uncle Batata), and "Dehket al-Masagen" (The Prisoners' Laughter).
Kibbeh is tempting (mince meat and pine nuts encased in bulgur wheat, PS7), as is a portion of sumac veggies (PS6), but we are swayed to order Batata Harra (PS4) after our waitress enthuses about it.
To enrich guests' experience, Al Terrace offers, from 12 noon until 11.30pm, a variety of cold mezzah such as babaganoush, fatoush, Houmous Beiruti and Muhammara; and piping hot mezzeh with the options including Batata Hara, Kabab Halabi, Al Terrace quail, etc., a selection of Lebanese specialties, especially seafood, such as 'Sayadiyah', and various types of Arabic grills.
A Taste of Lebanon featured Olives, Makdous, Feta, Hummus, Muttabel, Mohamara, Spinach Dip, Mujadra, Eggplant Stew, Cauliflower, Falafel and Batata Harra.
A Taste of Lebanon featured Olives,Makdous, Feta, Hummus, Muttabel, Mohamara, Spinach Dip, Mujadra, Eggplant Stew, Cauliflower, Falafel and Batata Harra.
The batata harra (PS4.95), which consisted of potatoes cooked in a spicy tomato sauce, was also delicious, while the hummus ala papa (PS4.95) was packed full of garlicky mushrooms.
SINCE I have been hearing about encounters becoming a daily event in Uttar Pradesh under the present government I decided that I would visit a police station there for an informal chat, 'Whenever we do something right we are criticized,' said the police chief, offering me my mandatory plate of batata vada and chutney from the police canteen downstairs, 'we have now perfected the art of the encounter and the media should be appreciative!'
A friend who recently visited Portugal told us that in Portuguese the aloo is called batata, in the same way that Maharashtrians say batata wada.