baton


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ba·ton

 (bə-tŏn′, bă-, băt′n)
n.
1. Music A slender wooden stick or rod used by a conductor to direct an orchestra, band, or other musical group.
2. A hollow metal rod with a heavy rubber tip or tips that is wielded and twirled by a drum major or drum majorette.
3. A short staff carried by certain public officials as a symbol of office.
4. Sports The hollow cylinder that is carried by each member of a relay team in a running race and passed to the next team member.
5. A short stick carried by police; a billy club.
6. Heraldry A shortened narrow bend, often signifying bastardy.

[French bâton, from Old French baston, stick, from Vulgar Latin *bastō, *bastōn-.]

baton

(ˈbætən; -tɒn)
n
1. (Classical Music) a thin stick used by the conductor of an orchestra, choir, etc, to indicate rhythm or expression
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms))
a. a short stick carried for use as a weapon, as by a policeman; truncheon
b. (as modifier): a baton charge.
3. (Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics a short bar carried by a competitor in a relay race and transferred to the next runner at the end of each stage
4. (Dancing) a long stick with a knob on one end, carried, twirled, and thrown up and down by a drum major or drum majorette, esp at the head of a parade
5. a staff or club carried by an official as a symbol of authority
6. (Heraldry) heraldry a single narrow diagonal line superimposed on all other charges, esp one curtailed at each end, signifying a bastard line
[C16: from French bâton, from Late Latin bastum rod, probably ultimately from Greek bastazein to lift up, carry]

ba•ton

(bəˈtɒn, bæ-, ˈbæt n)

n.
1. a wand with which a conductor directs an orchestra or band.
2. a metal rod fitted with a weighted bulb at each end and carried and twirled by a drum major or majorette.
3. a thin cylinder that is passed from one member of a relay team to the member next to compete.
4. a staff, club, or truncheon, esp. one serving as a mark of office or authority.
5. a slender heraldic bend.
[1540–50; < Middle French bâton, Old French baston < Vulgar Latin *bastōnem]

baton

Short bar carried by runners in a relay race.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baton - a thin tapered rod used by a conductor to lead an orchestra or choirbaton - a thin tapered rod used by a conductor to lead an orchestra or choir
rod - a long thin implement made of metal or wood
2.baton - a short stout club used primarily by policemenbaton - a short stout club used primarily by policemen
club - stout stick that is larger at one end; "he carried a club in self defense"; "he felt as if he had been hit with a club"
3.baton - a short staff carried by some officials to symbolize an office or an authority
staff - a strong rod or stick with a specialized utilitarian purpose; "he walked with the help of a wooden staff"
4.baton - a hollow metal rod that is wielded or twirled by a drum major or drum majorettebaton - a hollow metal rod that is wielded or twirled by a drum major or drum majorette
rod - a long thin implement made of metal or wood
5.baton - a hollow cylinder passed from runner to runner in a relay racebaton - a hollow cylinder passed from runner to runner in a relay race
sports implement - an implement used in a sport

baton

noun stick, club, staff, stake, pole, rod, crook, cane, mace, wand, truncheon, sceptre I could see a baton being used vigorously.
Translations
عَصـا الشُّرْطيعَصا قائِد الفِقَةِ الموسيقيَّه
taktovkakolíkobušek
knippelpolitistavtaktstok
karmesteri pálca
lögreglukylfatónsproti
lazda
stekszizlis
taktovka

baton

[ˈbætən]
A. N (Mus) → batuta f (Mil) → bastón m; [of policeman] → porra f; (in race) → testigo m
to hand on or pass the baton to sbentregar el testigo a algn
to pick up the batonrecoger el testigo
B. CPD baton charge Ncarga f con bastones
baton round Nbala f de goma

baton

[ˈbætɒn] n
(= stick) → bâton m
[conductor] → baguette f
(= club) → matraque f
(in race)témoin m
to hand the baton over to sb, to pass the baton to sb (fig)passer le relais à qn, passer le flambeau à qn
to pick up the baton (fig)prendre le relaisbaton charge baton-charge (British)
n (by the police)charge f à la matraque
vt [police] → charger à la matraque
vi [police] → charger à la matraque

baton

[, (US)]
n
(Mus) → Taktstock m, → Stab m; (Mil) → (Kommando)stab m; under the baton of (Mus) → unter der Stabführung von
(of policeman)Schlagstock m; (for directing traffic) → Stab m
(in relay race) → Staffelholz nt, → Stab m; to hand on or pass the baton to somebody (fig)die Verantwortung an jdn abgeben

baton

:
baton charge
nSchlagstockeinsatz m; to make a batonSchlagstöcke einsetzen
baton round
n (Mil) → Plastikgeschosse pl
baton twirler
nTambourmajor(in) m(f)

baton

[ˈbætn] n (Mus) → bacchetta (Mil) → bastone m di comando; (of policeman) → sfollagente m inv, manganello; (in race) → testimone m

baton

(ˈbӕton) , ((American) bӕˈta:n) noun
1. a short, heavy stick, carried by a policeman as a weapon.
2. a light, slender stick used when conducting an orchestra or choir. The conductor raised his baton.
References in classic literature ?
A submissive orchestra dictated to by a spectacled man with frowsy hair and a dress suit, industriously followed the bobs of his head and the waves of his baton.
My knapsack brought my head down first, and I pitched into some rocks about a dozen feet below; they caught something, and tumbled me off the edge, head over heels, into the gully; the baton was dashed from my hands, and I whirled downward in a series of bounds, each longer than the last; now over ice, now into rocks, striking my head four or five times, each time with increased force.
A commission which, if you carry it out well," said he, "will be worth a marechal's baton to you.
The rest of his toilet was soon achieved, and he proudly marched out of the room, wrapped up in his great pilot monkey jacket, and sporting his harpoon like a marshal's baton.
He held in his hand the roll of parchment, which, on this festive day, had become his baton.
He sang an ancient song of Killisnook and brandished his whip like a baton.
Your uncle Silas knowed a family in Baton Rouge that knowed his people very well.
It was not difficult to understand that he had gained the crown of his ambition and that the silver-mounted wand he brandished was in his eyes as honorable a distinction as the marshal's baton which Conde threw, or did not throw, into the enemy's line of battle at Fribourg.
what will it be then, if I double that fortune, and if, instead of the switch I now hold in my hand, I should ever carry the baton of a marechal?
Let a prejudice be bequeathed, carried in the air, adopted by hearsay, caught in through the eye,--however it may come, these minds will give it a habitation; it is something to assert strongly and bravely, something to fill up the void of spontaneous ideas, something to impose on others with the authority of conscious right; it is at once a staff and a baton.
The wound was, however, but a slight one, and the Frenchman was about to renew his onset, when, at a sign from the prince, Chandos threw down his baton, and the marshals of the lists struck up the weapons and brought the contest to an end.
He had in one hand a lighted torch, or link, and in the other a baton of crab-tree, so thick and heavy, that it might well be termed a club.