batten

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bat·ten 1

 (băt′n)
v. bat·tened, bat·ten·ing, bat·tens
v.intr.
1. To become fat.
2. To thrive and prosper, especially at another's expense: "[She] battens like a leech on the lives of famous people, ... a professional retailer of falsehoods" (George F. Will).
v.tr.
To fatten; overfeed.

[Ultimately from Old Norse batna, to improve; see bhad- in Indo-European roots.]

bat·ten 2

 (băt′n)
n.
1. Nautical
a. One of several flexible strips of wood or plastic placed in pockets at the outer edge of a sail to keep it flat.
b. A narrow strip of wood used to fasten down the edges of the material that covers hatches in foul weather.
2. A narrow strip of wood used in construction, especially to cover a seam between boards, as flooring material, or as a lath.
3.
a. The heavy swinging bar on a loom that holds the reed and is pulled forward to pack down the weft.
b. A flat stick used in weaving by hand to separate the upper and lower threads of the warp and to tighten the weft.
tr.v. bat·tened, bat·ten·ing, bat·tens
Nautical To furnish, fasten, or secure with battens: battened down the hatch during the storm.
Idiom:
batten down the hatches
To prepare for an imminent disaster or emergency.

[Alteration of Middle English batent, finished board or bar of wood, from Old French batant, wooden strip, clapper, from present participle of batre, to beat; see batter1. Noun, sense 3a and b, from French batant, from Old French.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

batten

(ˈbætən)
n
1. (Building) a sawn strip of wood used in building to cover joints, provide a fixing for tiles or slates, support lathing, etc
2. (Building) a long narrow board used for flooring
3. (Nautical Terms) a narrow flat length of wood or plastic inserted in pockets of a sail to give it proper shape
4. (Nautical Terms) a lath used for holding a tarpaulin along the side of a raised hatch on a ship
5. (Theatre) theatre
a. a row of lights
b. the strip or bar supporting them
6. (General Engineering) Also called: dropper NZ an upright part of a fence made of wood or other material, designed to keep wires at equal distances apart
vb
7. (General Engineering) (tr) to furnish or strengthen with battens
8. (Nautical Terms) to use battens in nailing a tarpaulin over a hatch on a ship to make it secure
9. to prepare for action, a crisis, etc
[C15: from French bâton stick; see baton]
ˈbattening n

batten

(ˈbætən)
vb
(usually foll by: on) to thrive, esp at the expense of someone else: to batten on the needy.
[C16: probably from Old Norse batna to improve; related to Old Norse betr better1, Old High German bazzen to get better]

Batten

(ˈbætən)
n
(Biography) Jean. 1909–82, New Zealand aviator: the first woman to fly single-handed from Australia to Britain (1935)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bat•ten2

(ˈbæt n)
n.
1. a small board or strip of wood used for various building purposes, as to cover joints between boards, reinforce doors, or supply a foundation for lath.
2.
a. a strip of wood used to keep a sail flat.
b. a length of wood or metal used on a ship, esp. to secure a tarpaulin over a hatch.
v.t.
3. to furnish or bolster with battens.
Idioms:
batten down the hatches,
a. to cover a ship's hatches with tarpaulins held in place with battens.
b. to prepare to meet an emergency.
[1400–50; late Middle English bataunt, batent finished board < Old French]

bat•ten1

(ˈbæt n)
v.i.
1. to thrive by feeding; grow fat.
2. to feed gluttonously or greedily.
3. to thrive, prosper, or live in luxury, esp. at the expense of others.
v.t.
4. to cause to thrive by or as if by feeding; fatten.
[1585–95; appar. < Old Norse batna to improve; akin to Gothic gabatnan, Old English gebatian to improve; see better1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

batten


Past participle: battened
Gerund: battening

Imperative
batten
batten
Present
I batten
you batten
he/she/it battens
we batten
you batten
they batten
Preterite
I battened
you battened
he/she/it battened
we battened
you battened
they battened
Present Continuous
I am battening
you are battening
he/she/it is battening
we are battening
you are battening
they are battening
Present Perfect
I have battened
you have battened
he/she/it has battened
we have battened
you have battened
they have battened
Past Continuous
I was battening
you were battening
he/she/it was battening
we were battening
you were battening
they were battening
Past Perfect
I had battened
you had battened
he/she/it had battened
we had battened
you had battened
they had battened
Future
I will batten
you will batten
he/she/it will batten
we will batten
you will batten
they will batten
Future Perfect
I will have battened
you will have battened
he/she/it will have battened
we will have battened
you will have battened
they will have battened
Future Continuous
I will be battening
you will be battening
he/she/it will be battening
we will be battening
you will be battening
they will be battening
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been battening
you have been battening
he/she/it has been battening
we have been battening
you have been battening
they have been battening
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been battening
you will have been battening
he/she/it will have been battening
we will have been battening
you will have been battening
they will have been battening
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been battening
you had been battening
he/she/it had been battening
we had been battening
you had been battening
they had been battening
Conditional
I would batten
you would batten
he/she/it would batten
we would batten
you would batten
they would batten
Past Conditional
I would have battened
you would have battened
he/she/it would have battened
we would have battened
you would have battened
they would have battened
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

batten

A wooden bar or metal pipe from which scenery or lights are suspended.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.batten - stuffing made of rolls or sheets of cotton wool or synthetic fiber
stuffing - padding put in mattresses and cushions and upholstered furniture
2.batten - a strip fixed to something to hold it firmbatten - a strip fixed to something to hold it firm
strip - thin piece of wood or metal
Verb1.batten - furnish with battens; "batten ships"
beef up, fortify, strengthen - make strong or stronger; "This exercise will strengthen your upper body"; "strengthen the relations between the two countries"
2.batten - secure with battens; "batten down a ship's hatches"
beef up, fortify, strengthen - make strong or stronger; "This exercise will strengthen your upper body"; "strengthen the relations between the two countries"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

batten

1
noun rod, bar, stick, stake, rail, pole, paling, shaft, palisade, crosspiece Timber battens can be fixed to the wall.
verb (usually with down) fasten, unite, fix, secure, lock, bind, chain, connect, attach, seal, tighten, anchor, bolt, clamp down, affix, nail down, make firm, make fast, fasten down The roof was never securely battened down.

batten

2 verb
batten on something or someone thrive, grow, develop, gain, advance, succeed, get on, boom, do well, flourish, bloom, wax, prosper, burgeon, fatten, grow rich battening on fears about mass immigration and unemployment
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

batten

verb
To make a large profit:
Slang: clean up.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عارِضَةٌ خَشَبِيّه
laťlištaprkno
bjælkespærre
battingur, mjótt borî/fjöl
skersinė lenta
apmetuma skaliņilatašķērskoks
lata
ince tahta parçasıtiriz

batten

[ˈbætn]
A. N (Brit) (Carpentry) → listón m (Naut) → junquillo m, sable m
B. VT [+ roof, shutters] → sujetar con listones
to batten down the hatches (also fig) → atrancar las escotillas
batten on VI + PREPexplotar, aprovecharse de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

batten

[ˈbætən] n
(CARPENTRY)latte f
(NAUTICAL, NAVAL) (on sail)latte f de voile
batten down
vt sep
to batten down the hatches (on ship)fermer les écoutilles (fig) (= prepare for rough times) → se préparer au pire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

batten

n
Leiste f, → Latte f; (for roofing) → Dachlatte f; (for flooring) → (Trag)latte f
(Naut, for sail) → Segellatte f; (for hatch) → Schalklatte f
vt
roof, floormit Latten versehen
(Naut) sailmit Latten verstärken; hatch(ver-)schalken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

batten

[ˈbætn] nlistello di legno (Carpentry) → assicella, correntino; (for flooring) → tavola (Naut) → serretta (000) (on sail) → stecca
batten down vt + adv (Naut) to batten down the hatcheschiudere i boccaporti (fig) → prepararsi per un'emergenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

batten

(ˈbӕtn) noun
a piece of wood used for keeping other pieces in place. These strips are all fastened together with a batten.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sir Richard has battened down the hatches of his "hurricane-proof " buildings.
And as Keys huffed and puffed in the windy conditions, the Ravens battened down the hatches to close out a deserved win.
FUNNYMAN Adrian Edmondson has battened down the hatches and cast anchors aweigh for his ITV series, which calls into Liverpool this week.
Schools were to stay closed and travel warnings were issued along Mexico's southern Pacific coast on Monday as a region still reeling from record flooding battened down the hatches against a major hurricane moving toward the shore.
Having battened down the hatches during the economic storm, many buyers are now sitting on significant war chests, and this renewed confidence is beginning to tempt them back on the acquisition trail."
During the first-half, the Seasiders, who lost just one game in lifting the South Wales Amateur League title, battened down the hatches into the wind.
FOLKESTONE battened down the hatches last night as it prepared to be hit by winds reaching 45mph overnight as predicted by the Met Office, writes Laura-Jayne Roberts.
Summary: Israel battened down the hatches at its main airport Thursday, awaiting hundreds of pro-Palestinian activists as Greece blocked the last boat in a scuppered campaign to ship aid to the Gaza Strip.